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"At a mile distant their thousand hooves were stuttering thunder, coming at a rate that frightened a man - they were an awe inspiring sight, galloping through the red haze - knee to knee and horse to horse - the dying sun glinting on bayonet points..." Trooper Ion Idriess

The Australian Light Horse Studies Centre aims to present an accurate history as chroniclers of early Australian military developments from 1899 to 1920.

The Australian Light Horse Studies Centre site holds over 12,000 entries and is growing daily.

Contact: Australian Light Horse Studies Centre

Let us hear your story: You can tell your story, make a comment or ask for help on our Australian Light Horse Studies Centre Forum called:

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WARNING: This site contains: names, information and images of deceased people; and, language which may be considered inappropriate today.

Wednesday, 2 January 2008
9th LHR AIF War Diary, 2 January
Topic: AIF - 3B - 9 LHR

9th LHR, AIF

9th Light Horse Regiment

War Diary, 2 January

Pro Gloria et Honore - For Glory and Honour

Regimental March -  Marching Through Georgia

 

 

The following entries are extracted and transcribed from the 9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary, the originals of which are held by the Australian War Memorial. There are 366 entries on this site. Each day has entries as they occurred from 1914 to 1919. In addition to the 9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary, when appropriate, entries from the 3rd Light Horse Brigade War Diary and other regiments with the Brigade will also appear. Entries from the unit history, Darley, TH, With the Ninth Light Horse in the Great War, Adelaide, Hassell Press, 1924 will also appear from time to time. The aim is to give the broadest context to the story and allow the reader to follow the day to day activities of the regiment. If a relative happened to have served in the regiment during the Great War, then this provides a general framework in which the individual story may be told.

 

The Diary

 

1914

Friday, January 2, 1914

See 4th Military District, South Australia for militia activities.

 

1915

Saturday, January 2, 1915

9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Broadmeadows, Victoria

9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - Organising, training and equipping of troops.

 

1916

Sunday, January 2, 1916

9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Heliopolis, Egypt

9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - No Entry

 

1917

Tuesday, January 2, 1917

9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Hod Masaid, Sinai

9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - The Regiment undertook routine work for the day. The weather was very cold and wet.

 

1918

Wednesday, January 2, 1918

9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Latron, Palestine

9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - Led horses under Ragless, Captain BB, arrived at 1000.

The Regiment moved mounted and gained the remainder of the Brigade at 1230.

The Brigade moved to Latron arriving at a point one mile south of Latron at 1535.

The Regiment bivouacked for the night.

 

1919

Thursday, January 2, 1919

9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Tripoli, Lebanon

9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - 1000 - 1100 - Swordsmanship mounted.

 

Previous: 9th LHR AIF War Diary, 1 January

Next: 9th LHR AIF War Diary, 3 January

 

Sources:

See: 9th Australian Light Horse Regiment, Contents

 

Further Reading:

9th Light Horse Regiment AIF

Bert Schramm Diary

9th Australian Light Horse Regiment, Roll of Honour 

Battles where Australians fought, 1899-1920

 


Citation: 9th LHR AIF War Diary, 2 January

Posted by Project Leader at 1:01 AM EAST
Updated: Tuesday, 13 July 2010 2:12 PM EADT
Gallipoli Campaign - 1915-16, 13th Light Horse Regiment, AIF, Roll of Honour
Topic: BatzG - Gallipoli

Gallipoli Campaign - 1915-16

13th Light Horse Regiment

AIF

Roll of Honour

 

Poppies on the Roll of Honour, Australian War Memorial, Canberra

 

The Roll of Honour contains the names of all the men from the 13th Light Horse Regiment known to have given their lives during the Gallipoli Campaign - 1915 - 1916.

 

Roll of Honour

 

931 Trooper John Henry FINCH, Died of wounds, 16 November 1915.

950 Trooper Edgar Henry FYVIE, Killed in action, 11 December 1915.

 

966 Trooper Thomas GILBERT, Died of wounds, 16 November 1915.

 

258 Trooper Thomas William HAYNES, Killed in action, 7 October 1915.

 

355 Trooper Bertram McCARTHY, Died of wounds, 19 September 1915.

520 Trooper James Allan McDOUGALL, Died of Disease, 4 October 1915.

341 Trooper Neil McMILLAN, Died of wounds, 25 November 1915.

 

401 Trooper Charles Thomas POOL, Killed in action, 12 December 1915.

 

32 Sergeant William Lennard ROBERTS, Killed in action, 27 November 1915.

 

471 Trooper George THORNHILL, Killed in action, 23 September 1915.

 

921 Trooper Clive UPTON, Died of wounds, 26 November 1915.

 

493 Trooper Roy Cameron WELMAN, Killed in action, 9 December 1915.

 

Lest We Forget

 

 

Further Reading:

13th Light Horse Regiment, AIF

Gallipoli Campaign - 1915-16

Gallipoli Campaign - 1915-16, Unit Casualties, AIF, Roll of Honour

Light Horse Battles

Battles where Australians fought, 1899-1920



Citation: Gallipoli Campaign - 1915-16, 13th Light Horse Regiment, AIF, Roll of Honour

Posted by Project Leader at 12:01 AM EAST
Updated: Sunday, 17 July 2011 11:01 PM EADT
Tuesday, 1 January 2008
9th LHR AIF War Diary, 1 January
Topic: AIF - 3B - 9 LHR

9th LHR, AIF

9th Light Horse Regiment

War Diary, 1 January

Pro Gloria et Honore - For Glory and Honour

Regimental March -  Marching Through Georgia

 

 

The following entries are extracted and transcribed from the 9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary, the originals of which are held by the Australian War Memorial. There are 366 entries on this site. Each day has entries as they occurred from 1914 to 1919. In addition to the 9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary, when appropriate, entries from the 3rd Light Horse Brigade War Diary and other regiments with the Brigade will also appear. Entries from the unit history, Darley, TH, With the Ninth Light Horse in the Great War, Adelaide, Hassell Press, 1924 will also appear from time to time. The aim is to give the broadest context to the story and allow the reader to follow the day to day activities of the regiment. If a relative happened to have served in the regiment during the Great War, then this provides a general framework in which the individual story may be told.

 

The Diary

 

1914

Thursday, January 1, 1914

See 4th Military District, South Australia for militia activities.

 

1915

Friday, January 1, 1915

9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Broadmeadows, Victoria

9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - Organising, training and equipping of troops.

 

1916

Saturday, January 1, 1916

9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Heliopolis, Egypt

9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - No Entry

 

1917

Monday, January 1, 1917

9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Hod Masaid, Sinai

9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - Moved out of Hod to Kilo 139 and bivouacked 1/2 mile south east of railway. Three enemy aeroplanes flew westward overhead.

 

1918

Tuesday, January 1, 1918

9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Kefr Rut, Palestine

9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - In bivouac at Kefr Rut. There was heavy rain all day.

 

1919

Wednesday, January 1, 1919

9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Tripoli, Lebanon

9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - Morning short New Year Church services. [Voluntary]

3rd Light Horse Brigade Mounted Sports eventuated today. The weather was perfect. Large numbers of visitors from other units attended, also many civilians. The 9th Light Horse Regiment scored well. The results as follows: -

Tent pegging with lance - 1st - Runn, 956 Sergeant HE; 2nd McIntosh, 1589 Lance Corporal WP.
Tilting the ring - 1st Trooper E Newton
Non Commissioned Officers flutter - 1st - Kincaid, 653 Lance Corporal AE.
Troopers flutter - 2nd Ferguson, Trooper SA.

Bleechmore, Major C, Ragless, Captain BB, Hogan, Lieutenant LR; and, 5 Other Ranks returned from leave in Egypt.

 

 

Previous: 9th LHR AIF War Diary, 31 December

Next: 9th LHR AIF War Diary, 2 January

 

Sources:

See: 9th Australian Light Horse Regiment, Contents

 

Further Reading:

9th Light Horse Regiment AIF

Bert Schramm Diary

9th Australian Light Horse Regiment, Roll of Honour 

Battles where Australians fought, 1899-1920

 


Citation: 9th LHR AIF War Diary, 1 January

Posted by Project Leader at 1:01 AM EAST
Updated: Tuesday, 13 July 2010 2:12 PM EADT
Gallipoli Campaign - 1915-16, 14th Infantry Battalion, AIF, Roll of Honour
Topic: BatzG - Gallipoli

Gallipoli Campaign - 1915-16

14th Infantry Battalion

AIF

Roll of Honour

 

Poppies on the Roll of Honour, Australian War Memorial, Canberra

 

The Roll of Honour contains the names of all the men from the 14th Infantry Battalion known to have given their lives during the Gallipoli Campaign - 1915 - 1916.

 

Roll of Honour

 

158 Private Harold Claude ABBEY, Died of wounds, 19 May 1915.

1326 Private Arthur ABERNETHY, Killed in action, 2 May 1915.

1444 Private Arthur AITKEN, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

160 Private Percival John ALDONS, Killed in action, 19 August 1915.

2102 Private Thomas Henry ALDRIDGE, Died of wounds, 28 August 1915.

1114 Lance Corporal David Thomson ALLAN, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1328 Private George Herbert ALLEN, Killed in action, 1 May 1915.

2103 Private William Walter ANDERSON, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

530 Private Robert Laurence ANGUS, Killed in action, 19 May 1915.

1314 Private Paul Dalton ANNEAR, Died of wounds, 28 August 1915.

808 Private Allan ANSELL, Killed in action, 26 August 1915.

2105 Private Eric Boyd ARMSTRONG, Killed in action, 25 August 1915.

2250 Private Arthur Sydney ATRIDGE, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

 

1904 Lance Corporal Cyril George Nicholas BAKER, Killed in action, 27 August 1915.

1130 Private Herbert William Alfred BAKER, Killed in action, 2 May 1915.

1197 Sergeant Thomas Leslie BARRATT, Killed in action, 1 May 1915.

1569 Private Oliver Arnold BATCH, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1537 Private Hugh BAXTER, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

818 Lance Corporal Rupert Charles BAZIN, Killed in action, 1 May 1915.

1912 Private William John BEATON, Killed in action, 27 August 1915.

1911 Private William BEBBINGTON, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

2345 Private Raymond Charles BENNETT, Died of wounds, 17 December 1915.

29 Private Robert BETHEL, Killed in action, 14 August 1915.

560 Private Frank Southam BINNS, Killed in action, 19 May 1915.

1574 Private Norman Samuel BLOCK, Died of wounds, 8 June 1915.

1573 Private Duncan BLYTHEN, Died of wounds, 29 May 1915.

1670 Private Augustus Frederick BODEN, Killed in action, 7 August 1915.

1338 Private Arthur Ernest BOLGER, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

1570 Private James BOOLEY, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1223 Private Wilfred BOOTH, Killed in action, 26 April 1915.

33 Corporal James BOWEN, Died of wounds, 29 April 1915.

2120 Private Wilhemy BOWLEY, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1916 Private John Joseph BRAY, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1856 Lance Corporal Percival James BREWER, Died of wounds, 12 August 1915.

1714 Private William BREWSTER, Killed in action, 27 August 1915.

2119 Private Reginald Stuart BRIANT, Killed in action, 22 August 1915.

1332 Private James Walter BRIGGS, Died of Accident, 24 May 1915.

683 Private William Alder BROWN, Killed in action, 2 May 1915.

959 Corporal Richard Harvey BURTON, Killed in action, 29 April 1915.

40 Corporal James BUTTERWORTH, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

 

1919 Private Vincent Patrick CAHILL, Died of wounds, 29 July 1915.

177 Private Robert Arthur CALDWELL, Killed in action, 6 June 1915.

2121 Private Henry CALEY, Killed in action, 7 August 1915.

180 Private Benjamin CALLAGHAN, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1297 Private Thomas Waddell CAMERON, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

963 Private Francis CANNING, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

692 Private John Henry CARTWRIGHT, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1722 Private Cecil CHANDLER, Killed in action, 27 August 1915.

2128 Private Charles Percy CHAPMAN, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

1581 Private Thomas CHETTLE, Killed in action, 7 August 1915.

1922 Sergeant Henry Dawson CHIPPINDALL, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

675 Lance Corporal Charles CHISHOLM, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

1583 Private Alfred CHRISTIE, Killed in action, 2 May 1915.

966 Corporal George Roy CLAPHAM, Killed in action, 13 September 1915.

1672 Private Norman CLARK, Killed in action, 30 May 1915.

1579 Private David Purdie CLEMENT, Killed in action, 19 May 1915.

43 Private William COHEN, Died of wounds, 30 April 1915.

174 Private Herbert Daniel COLE, Killed in action, 19 May 1915.

1343 Private Claude Hamilton COLEMAN, Killed in action, 1 November 1915.

561 Private Thomas COLEMAN, Killed in action, 28 August 1915.

Captain Clive Emerson CONNELLY, Killed in action, 28 August 1915.

48 Private Thomas CONROY, Killed in action, 20 August 1915.

Lieutenant Keith George Wallace CRABBE, Killed in action, 22 August 1915.

839 Corporal Albert CUBITT, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

Lieutenant Kenneth CURLEWIS, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

831 Private Harry CURRIE, Killed in action, 1 May 1915.

Lieutenant Arthur Herbert CURWEN-WALKER, Died of wounds, 3 May 1915.

 

1669 Private Rowland George DAVEY, Killed in action, 27 August 1915.

973 Private Frederick DAVIES, Died of wounds, 30 April 1915.

1928 Private Frank Edgar DAVIS, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

575 Private Gordon Edgerton DAVIS, Died of wounds, 30 April 1915.

1931 Private Frank DAVISON, Died of wounds, 7 August 1915.

702 Private William Alfred DAY, Killed in action, 19 May 1915.

975 Private Arthur Benjamin DE BROUGHE, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1163 Private Owen Francis DEAN, Killed in action, 29 April 1915.

1153 Private William Scoones DEWELL, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

412 Private Clarence DODDS, Killed in action, 30 April 1915.

1137 Private Joseph DONOHUE, Died of wounds, 29 April 1915.

438 Private Claude Campbell Telford DOUGLAS, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

437 Lance Corporal William James DOYLE, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

1462 Private Thomas William DRAY, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

Second Lieutenant Frank DUFFIELD, Killed in action, 22 August 1915.

568 Private James Gordon DUPUY, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1655 Private Gilbert Bere Ford DYER, Killed in action, 28 April 1915.

 

1156 Private William Robert EARL, Killed in action, 28 May 1915.

579 Private Robert Bevian EARLL, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

2137 Private Samuel Henry EDMUNDS, Killed in action, 20 August 1915.

1540 Private George ELDRIDGE, Died of wounds, 18 August 1915.

2257 Private William Henry ELLIOTT, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

187 Private Alexander EMSLIE, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

189 Private George Charles ENGLISH, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

 

1356 Private Albert Ernest FAWKNER, Killed in action, 9 August 1915.

1546 Private Joseph Henry FEETAM, Killed in action, 2 May 1915.

320 Corporal Hugh FEGAN, Died of wounds, 28 August 1915.

2141 Private Sydney FENWICK, Killed in action, 20 August 1915.

583 Private David Henry FINDLAY, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

1740 Private Joseph Michael FITZPATRICK, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

445 Private Walter Bell FLETCHER, Killed in action, 5 May 1915.

1710A Private Thomas FOLEY, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

531 Private Norman Wakefield FOLKS, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

192 Private Philip FRAHER, Killed in action, 28 April 1915.

1938 Private Henry FRANCIS, Killed in action, 27 August 1915.

1939 Private Frank FRANKLIN, Killed in action, 27 August 1915.

319 Private Walter Warwick FRASER, Killed in action, 1 May 1915.

190 Private Arthur Ernest FREEMAN, Killed in action, 27 August 1915.

53 Private Albert Edward FREESTONE, Killed in action, 28 August 1915.

 

2058 Private John Joseph GALVIN, Died of wounds, 25 August 1915.

1940 Private Albert GARNER, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

1596 Private Gladwyn O'brien GARNETT, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

325 Private William Arthur GARTON, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1470 Private Edwin Robert GIBSON, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

1750 Private Edward William GILCHRIST, Killed in action, 27 August 1915.

2260 Private Charles William GILROY, Killed in action, 27 August 1915.

57 Private Charles GIST, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

446 Lance Corporal William GOBLE, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

862 Private Francis Gordon GORMAN, Killed in action, 1 May 1915.

449 Sergeant Louis Leonard GRANT, Died of wounds, 30 August 1915.

196 Private Robert GREENFIELD, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1434 Corporal George William GREENGRASS, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

58 Private Charles Gustus GREENHAM, Died of wounds, 1 May 1915.

1946 Private Frederick GREENWOOD, Died of wounds, 11 August 1915.

1948 Private Horace Leslie GREY, Killed in Action, 28 August 1915.

1676 Private Samuel GRIFFITHS, Killed in action, 27 August 1915.

Captain William Edward GROOM, Killed in action, 7 August 1915.

 

2155 Private William HALES, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

1471 Private Michael HALLIGAN, Killed in action, 20 August 1915.

Lieutenant William Hugh HAMILTON, Killed in action, 18 May 1915.

1950 Private William HAMMOND, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

218 Corporal James Arthur HARDING, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

Lieutenant Harold Robert HARRIS, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

2045 Private Lovell Poulett HARRIS, Killed in Action, 27 August 1915.

1002 Corporal John HART, Killed in action, 26 August 1915.

1361 Private William HARTLAND, Killed in action, 29 August 1915.

1752 Private Walter James HEGARTY, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1249 Private James Joseph HENKEL, Killed in action, 28 April 1915.

593 Corporal Frank HEWETT, Killed in action, 10 August 1915.

68 Private Herbert James HICKEY, Killed in action, 23 May 1915.

1003 Private Colin HICKS, Died of wounds, 14 May 1915.

1365 Private Thomas HIGGINBOTTOM, Killed in action, 25 August 1915.

Lieutenant Thomas Ninian Wardrop HILL, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

456 Private John HISLOP, Killed in action, 1 May 1915.

1600 Private Joseph Andrew HOARE, Died of wounds, 20 August 1915.

Captain William Ross HOGGART, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

1958 Private James Richard HOLLOWAY, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

206 Private Henry HONEYCHURCH, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

453 Corporal Thomas Frank HOPE, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

219 Corporal Alfred Charles HOWAT, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

1757 Private George Frederick HUDSON, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1759 Private Harold Aubrey HUNGERFORD, Died of wounds, 24 August 1915.

1478 Private Lewis HUTCHINSON, Died of wounds, 11 August 1915.

207 Private Leslie HYDE, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

 

879 Private James Thomas INMAN, Died of wounds, 26 July 1915.

2162 Private Adolphus George ISON, Killed in action, 25 August 1915.

 

1432 Sergeant Alfred Lachlan JACK, Killed in action, 28 August 1915.

1767 Private Claude Beresford JAMES, Killed in action, 20 August 1915.

1607 Private Thomas JAMIESON, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

883 Private Frederick Walter JANES, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1230 Private Harry JARMAN, Killed in action, 26 May 1915.

1358 Private Ernest John JEAL, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

1480 Private Chester Royal JENKINS, Killed in action, 27 August 1915.

1481 Private William Benjamin JENKINS, Died of Disease, 29 August 1915.

224 Private Harry Jarvis JENNINGS, Died of wounds, 30 August 1915.

1962 Private Henry Louis JOHNS, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

225 Corporal John Frederick JOHNSON, Killed in action, 29 May 1915.

600 Corporal Arthur JOHNSTON, Died of wounds, 22 August 1915.

1540 Private Thomas Valentine JOHNSTONE, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

222 Private Alfred Robert JONES, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

331 Private Harold Vernon JORDAN, Killed in action, 1 May 1915.

 

1008 Private John KEENAN, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

333 Private James KELLY, Killed in action, 27 August 1915.

1483 Private Michael James KELLY, Killed in action, 5 May 1915.

340 Private William Joseph KELSALL, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

2169 Private Leon Patrick KENNELLY, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

884 Sergeant Frederick Hugh KEWLEY, Killed in action, 1 May 1915.

1968 Private Peter KILLEN, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

887 Private Thomas Edgar KITCHENER, Died of wounds, 24 May 1915.

337 Private Edward Gerald KNEALE, Killed in action, 7 August 1915.

 

1012 Lance Corporal Percy Bernard LAKER, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1974 Private John LAMPARD, Died of wounds, 12 August 1915.

1013 Private Norman Stanley LAYTON, Killed in action, 2 May 1915.

1275 Private David LEE, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

2171 Private Henry Robert LEE, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1164 Private Vere Lionel LEES, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1178 Private William Herbert Charles LEESON, Killed in action, 2 May 1915.

1616 Private Edward LESLIE, Killed in action, 10 May 1915.

1072 Private Arthur Harold LEWIS, Died of wounds, 13 August 1915.

1014 Private George Barret LEWIS, Killed in action, 29 April 1915.

1290 Private John LEYDIN, Killed in action, 7 August 1915.

1689 Private Charles Arthur LINDREA, Killed in action, 24 May 1915.

1522 Private Ernest Charles LOGAN, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1375 Private Alfred Herbert LOVE, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

1488 Private Michael LYNCH, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

 

609 Lance Corporal Michael Francis MACOBOY, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

95 Lance Corporal James Anthony MAHONEY, Killed in action, 17 May 1915.

1975 Private Thomas MAKIN, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

2188 Private William MALADY, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

744 Private James MALCOLM, Killed in Action, 7 August 1915.

748 Private Stanley MARS, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

616 Private Arthur Treve MARSH, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

1789 Private William MARSHALL, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

Second Lieutenant John Hilbert MATTHEWS, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1017 Private Percy MATTINGLY, Died of wounds, 29 April 1915.

1392 Private Mckenzie MAXWELL, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1431 Sergeant William McALLISTER, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1299 Private William James McALPINE, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

908 Private David McARTHUR, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1541 Private James McCABE, Killed in action, 28 August 1915.

1023 Private William Albert McCOLL, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

757 Sergeant Francis McDERMOTT, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

1790 Private Richard Joseph Patrick McDONAGH, Killed in action, 20 August 1915.

1786 Private Charles McJARROW, Died of wounds, 10 August 1915.

1788 Private William Roy McKAY, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

357 Private Charles McKENZIE, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

904 Corporal Hector McLAREN, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

354 Private John Raymund McLEAN, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

1390 Private John McNAB, Killed in action, 2 May 1915.

1849 Private James McNAMARA, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1028 Private Colin McPHERSON, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

2183 Private Francis Edward MEHEGAN, Killed in action, 20 August 1915.

618 Private William MIDDLEBROOK, Died of wounds, 29 July 1915.

1236 Private Leslie Washington MILLER, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

2046 Private Percy MILLER, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

745 Private William MILNE, Died of wounds, 1 June 1915.

1167 Corporal William David MINOGUE, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

893 Private William John Pike MORGAN, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1981 Private Herbert Richard MORRIS, Killed in action, 27 August 1915.

1389 Private George MORRISON, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

234 Private John MOSS, Died of wounds, 19 November 1915.

1683 Private William Victor MOW, Killed in action, 19 May 1915.

1095 Private Richard Thomas MUIRSON, Killed in action, 5 June 1915.

473 Lance Corporal George Lawrence MURPHY, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

902 Sergeant William Patrick MURPHY, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

 

245 Private William NAISMITH, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

362 Lance Corporal Frederick Mcrae NEAL, Killed in action, 1 May 1915.

1294 Lance Corporal Frederick James NEGRO, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

2253 Private Harry NEILSON, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

483 Sergeant Roland NEWTON, Killed in action, 28 April 1915.

 

632 Lance Corporal William Henry O'BREE, Killed in action, 2 May 1915.

367 Lance Corporal John Thomas O'BRYAN, Killed in action, 20 August 1915.

911 Private Reginald Le Poer OLDHAM, Killed in action, 29 May 1915.

105 Private Robert Jonah OLIVER, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

2194 Private Richard Ernest O'SHANNASSY, Killed in action, 20 August 1915.

1664 Private John Richard OWEN, Died of wounds, 20 June 1915.

1991 Private John Stanley OWEN, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

 

2197 Private Alfred James PARSONS, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

248 Private Ernest PARTRIDGE, Died of wounds, 28 April 1915.

1631 Private John PATERSON, Killed in action, 29 August 1915.

2198 Private Frank Eugene PEARCE, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1034 Private Angus George PETTIGREW, Killed in action, 29 April 1915.

1394 Private George PHILIP, Killed in action, 24 May 1915.

254 Private John Eddy PHILLIPS, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1037 Private Frederic Henry PITHER, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

368 Private George William PRESTON, Killed in action, 7 August 1915.

 

1997 Sergeant William Michael QUIRKE, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

 

372 Private Alexander Russell RACKSTRAW, Killed in action, 30 April 1915.

1400 Private Harold William RASDELL, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1851 Private Benjamin RATTRAY, Killed in action, 26 August 1915.

256 Private Joseph Thomas REECE, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

370 Private Lionel RICHARDS, Killed in action, 6 August 1915.

1634 Private Alfred RICHARDSON, Killed in action, 25 April 1915.

524 Lance Corporal Thomas RITCHIE, Killed in action, 6 May 1915.

774 Corporal Cecil James ROBINSON, Died of wounds, 13 August 1915.

373 Lance Corporal Norman Prior ROONEY, Killed in action, 1 May 1915.

1399 Private Thomas ROSS, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

1402 Private Victor ROWLES, Died of wounds, 10 August 1915.

371 Private William George RUSSELL, Killed in action, 28 August 1915.

Lieutenant John Bishop RUTLAND, Killed in action, 1 May 1915.

1401 Private Robert Matthew RYAN, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

 

1108 Lance Corporal Ralph SAYERS, Killed in action, 19 May 1915.

1047 Private Henry John SCHMIDT, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1433 Corporal George Phillip SCOTT, Killed in action, 24 May 1915.

2009 Private Arthur Thomas SEYMOUR, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

2211 Private Clarence Roy SHARP, Killed in action, 25 August 1915.

494 Private Albert Edward SHEEHAN, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

387 Private Frederick SHELDON, Killed in action, 30 April 1915.

2212 Private James Henry SHORT, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

2213 Private Vincent Albert SILVA, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1052 Private Herbert SIMMONS, Killed in action, 20 May 1915.

1217 Private Archibald SIMPSON, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1240 Corporal William Richard Norton SKILTON, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

1227 Private Frank Miller SLATER, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1429 Private Alexander SMITH, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1051 Corporal Arthur SMITH, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

383 Private George Fred Herbert SMITH, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

1122 Lance Corporal George William SMITH, Killed in action, 4 May 1915.

1172 Private Harold George SMITH, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

661 Private Leslie Jack SMITH, Killed in action, 27 May 1915.

1049 Lance Sergeant Percy SMITH, Died of wounds, 29 April 1915.

Second Lieutenant Quinton Robert SMITH, Died of wounds, 3 May 1915.

492 Private Samuel SMITH, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

126 Private Septimus Sydney SMITH, Killed in action, 19 August 1915.

777 Private Stanley Herbert SMITH, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

2015 Private Noel Travers Edgeworth SOMERS, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1727 Private Alfred SPENCE, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

649 Private Edward Howard SPENCER, Killed in action, 3 May 1915.

2019 Lance Corporal Charles STABELL, Killed in action, 20 August 1915.

1073 Private Sydney Joseph STATHAM, Killed in action, 6 May 1915.

1053 Private George William STEELE, Died of wounds, 8 May 1915.

1273 Private Alan STEPHENS, Killed in action, 30 April 1915.

1054 Private Arthur Edward STEVENSON, Killed in action, 20 August 1915.

1413 Private Bartholomew George STILWELL, Died of Disease, 7 May 1915.

1099 Sergeant Thomas Clouston STOKAN, Killed in action, 27 August 1915.

662 Sergeant Alexander Thomas SWIFT, Killed in action, 20 August 1915.

 

1418 Private Ernest TAYLOR, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

792 Private William George Morley THEOBALD, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

1305 Private Charlie THEWLIS, Killed in action, 2 May 1915.

134 Private Victor Frederick THOMPSON, Died of wounds, 9 July 1915.

135 Lance Corporal John William THOMSON, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

274 Private Raymond Mark THORNTON, Killed in action, 2 May 1915.

390 Private George Thomas TIPPETT, Killed in action, 1 May 1915.

666 Private Jack TREVAN, Died of wounds, 29 April 1915.

2219 Private Herbert TRUSCOTT, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

397 Private George TURNBULL, Killed in action, 12 May 1915.

1516 Private George Leo TWIGHT, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

501 Sergeant Edwin TWOSE, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

395 Private Harrie Raymond TWYFORD, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1416 Private John TYLER, Killed in action, 19 May 1915.

 

2070 Private Norman Joseph VEAL, Killed in action, 7 August 1915.

668 Private Geoffrey Colborne VEEL, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

141 Private Joseph Williams VERSWYVELT, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

 

1423 Private Andrew WALKER, Killed in action, 19 May 1915.

2029 Private Lycester Gordon Armstrong WALLIS, Killed in action, 21 August 1915.

1422 Private James Lawrence WALSH, Died of wounds, 8 August 1915.

505 Private William Edward WARNES, Died of wounds, 8 August 1915.

Lieutenant Robert WARREN, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

2031 Private Frank WASSELL, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

2032 Private Rhys WEBB, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

399 Corporal Charles WELLS, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1544 Private William WELSH, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

507 Private James Brydon WHEELAGHAN, Died of wounds, 10 August 1915.

1211 Corporal Eric WHITE, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

402 Corporal Edmund Reginald WHITTERON, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

278 Private Powell John WIGHT, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

931 Private Albert WILKINSON, Killed in action, 30 April 1915.

1649 Private Frank WILLIAMS, Killed in action, 7 August 1915.

1829 Private Leslie Lloyd WILLIAMS, Killed in action, 7 August 1915.

940 Driver Llewellyn WILLIAMS, Killed in action, 7 August 1915.

1251 Private Percival WILLIAMS, Died of wounds, 2 May 1915.

1666 Private Samuel Cloy WILLIAMS, Died of wounds, 12 August 1915.

148 Sergeant William Edwin WILLIAMS, Died of wounds, 31 August 1915.

518 Private John WILLS, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

1424 Private Elvas Roy WILSON, Died of Disease, 30 May 1916.

1278 Private Harry WILSON, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

515 Lance Corporal William WILSON, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

2039 Private Henry WISE, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

398 Private James Arthur WISEMAN, Killed in action, 26 August 1915.

514 Private John William WOODS, Killed in action, 6 May 1915.

150 Private David WREN, Killed in action, 27 April 1915.

 

2231 Private Phillip Alexander YOUNG, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

153 Private Robert Edwin YOUNG, Died of wounds, 29 April 1915.

2042 Private Thomas YOUNGER, Killed in action, 8 August 1915.

 

Lest We Forget

 

 

Further Reading:

Gallipoli Campaign - 1915-16

Gallipoli Campaign - 1915-16, Unit Casualties, AIF, Roll of Honour

Light Horse Battles

Battles where Australians fought, 1899-1920



Citation: Gallipoli Campaign - 1915-16, 14th Infantry Battalion, AIF, Roll of Honour

Posted by Project Leader at 12:01 AM EAST
Updated: Sunday, 17 July 2011 10:59 PM EADT
The Battle of Broken Hill, New South Wales, 1 January 1915, Barrier Miner Account
Topic: BatzA - Broken Hill

Australian Battles 

The Battle of Broken Hill, New South Wales, 1 January 1915

Barrier Miner Account

 

Barrier Miner, (Broken Hill), Saturday, 2 January 1915, pp. 4-5

 

The following description is extracted from the Barrier Miner, published in Broken Hill on Saturday, 2 January 1915, from pp. 4-5:

 

THE NEW YEAR'S DAY MASSACRE.

THRILLING EXPERIENCES.

THE MUDERERS: WHO AND WHAT THEY WERE

A NIGHT OF RIOT.

GERMAN CLUB PREMISES FIRED.

ASIATIC CAMP THREATENED.

INQUEST ON THE VICTIMS OPENED.

THE TURK ATTACKERS.

WHO AND WHAT THEY WERE.

(By One Who Knew Them)

Mulla Abdulla, one of the attackers in the raid, had been 16 years in Broken Hill, chiefly camel-driving. For the past few years he had been butcher for the camp at North Broken Hill, vested with priest-rights in order to kill according to the Mahommedan religion. He was of a very reserved disposition, rarely speaking to anyone, and even the men in the camp are not sure where he was born. He was always childish and simple in his ways, and small, children were in the habit of throwing' stones at him, but beyond occasionally complaining to the police he was never known to retaliate. He was convicted last month for killing a sheep off licensed premises, and although given time he was unable to pay his fine, and became very broody as a result. About, this time Mahomed Gool came to the camp, and lived next to Mulla Abdullah and the two appeared to have taken up to one another. They smoked together Indian hemp, known to the natives by the name of gungha - this is said to be even more potent than opium. Mahomed Gool is said to have been a Turk; born near the Persian border. He was in Broken Hill previously many years ago, then left Australia and travelled the world. He returned here about two years ago, and lived in central Broken Hill, working on the mines. He was a Mahommedan, and on that account and having no work he shifted to the camel camp a few weeks ago.

Mulla Abdulla was never known to possess firearms, and it is believed, says the man giving this information, that Mahomed Gool found them, and the ammunition, and with the help of "Gungha" had Mulla Abdulla under his sway.

The men at the camp; although called Afghans, are not. They come from various parts of India, and are all British subjects. Many of the men have served in the British army and at the commencement of the war, thinking, that fighting would take place in Adelaide, went to the police station and offered their services, saying they would fight for Australia to a man. They are said to take great interest in the fighting, and are intensely loyal. There has been quite an exodus lately of these men returning to India (paying their own expenses) to take the place at home of younger relations who have gone to the front with the Indian army. Five men left together for this purpose only three weeks ago.

The men at the camel camp are very bitter against the perpetrators of yesterday's raid, and say they will have nothing to do with the bodies. They say also that, there is but one Afghan in the camp. He is married to white woman and has five children.


THE REASON.

INSPECTOR MILLER'S VIEW

The question has been asked over and over, again, and by many people since yesterday morning's tragic occurrence, as to the motive of the men in attacking the picnic train with its load of women and children, and how they came to do such an act when they must have known that for them there could be no escape.

Inspector Miller, last night, when the question was put to him, expressed the view that Gool Mahomed was the instigator of the affair.

"Gool Mahomed is a Turk," he said, "with a Turk's lust for blood, and he was out for revenge as an enemy of the British. I believe that he talked Abdulla, who is a Hindu, in into it. Abdullah was fined in the court recently, and was unable to raise the money to pay the fine. Mahomed probably used this as a lever and suggested to Abdullah that there was very little to live for, and that he was certain to be arrested to undergo imprisonment. He no doubt preyed upon Abdullah's mind until he was persuaded that it was better to die and that it would be dying gloriously and with the certainty of great happiness in the hereafter if he killed as many of the British as he could before he was himself slain. Mahomed then made his plans and Abdullah, falling in with them, the pair carried them through with all the tragic awfulness of the result."

In his efforts to persuade the crowd to forego their intended attack on the Afghan camp last night, the inspector used the argument that the Turk was the responsible party, and that it was unjust to accuse the Afghans, many of whom had volunteered for service with the British forces, of any actual or even intended participation in yesterday's tragedy.


ON THE TRAIN.

EXCURSIONISTS' EXPERIENCES.

A lady who was one of a party of friends on the M.U. picnic train yesterday, recounted her experiences to a "Miner" reporter last night. The lady had not long been out from England, and the ride in the open trucks - a kind of passenger accommodation unheard of at home for generations - had been looked forward to by her as a new experience.

"It was certainly a novel experience," she stated, "and it was also a terrible one. It was an experience I shall never forget as long as I live. There was only one truck between the one I was in and the one that suffered most from the firing.

"It was all so sudden, so unexpected, so astounding, that one almost forgot to feel afraid, but gazed instead in open mouthed wonder," she continued. "We saw the ice-cream cart drawn up near the pipe track as we came along and we saw the flag on the cart. One of our party jocularly remarked that if they were taking ice-cream to the picnic they would be just about in time to meet the train coming back. Even when we heard firing we did not think anything was wrong. We thought it was perhaps a sham fight, or some target practice. Then we saw the Turks with their guns deliberately pointed in the direction of the people on the train. Very quickly we knew the worst, and the next few minutes was, a very trying period indeed: We were wondering who the next victim would be. The train soon hurried us out of range, however. Nearly everybody was shouting out to the driver to stop, but we went on to the Acacia dam, from where some of the people telephoned the awful news to town. The train pulled up at the scene of the firing for a time and a number of young men jumped out and rushed towards the place where the Turks had been firing from. But the Turks ran off. One woman who was lifted out presented an awful appearance. She, and the baby clasped in her, arms, were covered in blood. The man on the cycle, who was shot, was laid on the embankment just by our truck and he looked awful. We had not gone far on the journey back when the train was met by motor cars, with the doctors and police, and friends of some of the picnic party.

"I am sure," concluded the lady, "that the men intended to shoot the engine driver, but misjudged the distance and the pace of the train as the first shots entered a truck very near the front of the train."

Another picnicker, a young man, stated that he was in one of the trucks with a number of other young fellows. They were having a jolly time amongst themselves. When they saw the ice-cream cart they shouted "Happy New Year," and "Good luck, old-fellow," in hearty style, just for the fun of the thing. Then the shooting started.

"Me and some of the fellows jumped out of the trucks we were in and sought refuge behind the front carriage. Two or three stray shots however, came amongst us, and we ran to better shelter behind the railway embankment, and there stayed until the train was under weigh again. Some of the fellows, more plucky than we made a dash for the nearest telephone in order to ring up for assistance."

The young man had one of the cartridges which had been picked up in his pocket, and he showed it to "The Miner" man. It was a large cartridge, much larger , than the ordinary cartridges now served out to the troops, and the bullet was very large indeed.


A NARROW ESCAPE

Mr. P. Nelsen was one of those on board the train who had a narrow escape. A bullet, he says, whistled past his ear, after entering the brake in which he, Mr J Davis, and others were, and embedded itself in the other side of the carriage, entering woodwork and bulging the steel plates on the outside. He, this morning, went to the Silverton Tramway Company's offices and saw Messrs. Sheehan and Spence, asking for the bullet to keep as a memento. They promised to extract the bullet after the police had finished their inquiries into the whole tragedy. "I am lucky to be alive," said Mr. Nelsen this morning. "Another eighth of an inch and I would not be alive to-day. I shall never forget New Year's Day of 1915."


BOYS' STORY.

QUESTIONED BY MURDERERS AT GOODS STATION.

Two boys (Rex Thorn and Reg Bray), both of Newton- street, Railway Town, were returning from the coach station at about 9.30 a.m., after driving some lady passengers to join the picnic train, when they noticed an ice-cream cart near the Pell street railway crossing. As they came close to the cart the driver (Mullah Abdullah ) signalled by putting his hand up for the lads to stop. They did so, and Mullah Abdullah asked if the picnic train to Silverton had gone, and the lads replied "No." He then asked "What time does it start ?" and they told him. He next inquired "What is the time now?" and the boys replied. He finally asked which way the train went, and they having told him, said "Good day," and drove on.

The boys state that both men were wearing turbans, but that there was nothing suspicious in their appearance, nor was the red flag at that time flying.


A PLUCKY BOY.

Among the army of armed men who were fighting the murderous Turk and his companion yesterday was a boy with a pea rifle as his weapon. He took up a position well in the firing line, and appeared to be as keen as anyone for opportunities to take a shot at the enemy.


ONE OF THE VICTIMS.

Mr. A. E. Millard, one of the victims of the tragedy, was a resident of Rennie-street, Balmain, Sydney. He took Mr. J. Duncalfe's position in connection with the pipe- laying of the Umberumberka water service. Mr. Duncalfe's father was the inventor of the wooden water pipe in America, the pipe being used in connection with the Umberumberka scheme.


THE WOUNDED.

PROGRESSING FAVORABLY.

It was stated over the telephone from the Hospital this morning that the wounded patients who were brought in, from the M.U. picnic train after the shooting affray yesterday were on the mend.


IN THE MORGUE.

In the morgue at one time yesterday were the bodies of the two murderers and their four victims from the M.U. picnic train. It is doubtful if the place has ever before held so many bodies of persons who had met with violent death.


THE FIGHTING.

PRAISE FOR MILITARY, POLICE, AND CIVILIANS.

It was warm work for the soldiers, police, and civilians who were out exchanging shots with the Turks who fired on the M.U. picnic train yesterday.

"We must have been exchanging shots for nearly two hours," said Sergeant Dimond. 'To us every minute seemed an awfully long time. For a time the Turks kept bobbing their heads out and having a shot and then seeking cover again. I believe that one of them was settled early in the fight, however, as for a long time only one man was firing. He kept going pretty briskly for about an hour and then his shots became less frequent and less dangerous. He was evidently badly wounded, and could shoot only with difficulty. I was told that just before the end came the surviving Turk was seen to stagger to his feet and hold his arms out without any gun in them and that in one hand he clutched something. that looked like a white handkerchief. It was suggested that he was flying a flag of truce for surrender, but 1 did not see it myself.

"I escaped the bullets," continued the sergeant, "but I was told afterwards that at one time the bullets were dropping all around me. The military behaved splendidly all day, and were of the very greatest assistance to us. So also were armed civilians."

Inspector Miller joined with the sergeant in praising the military, and they were also one in opinion as regards Lieutenant R. N. J. Resch, who, they stated, acted splendidly and did all that it was possible, for him to do with willingness and promptitude that were very gratifying.

The police also received their mede of praise.

"Sergeant Dimond," said a man in the street last night while a reporter was standing by, "I'm very pleased to see that you are safe. I'd heard that you had been wounded; I'm really sincerely glad that you hare escaped and keenly sorry that some of your men were, injured. I've often said hard things about you in ordinary times when I have seen you doing your duty. But I see now that you are prepared to do your duty even under the risk of death. The police all did their work finely. I'm only a hard worker on the mines, but I'll remember this day's work and the bravery of the police."

The speech was a long one and was several times interrupted by the sergeant with: "That's all right, old follow," "Oh, yes, it's all right," and other remarks, but the man was determined to express his appreciation, and be did so.


THE INQUEST OPENED.

ADJOURNED UNTIL NEXT WEEK.

The inquest on the bodies of the victims of yesterday's tragedy was formally opened this morning at the Courthouse by Mr. Butler, .S.M., coroner.

Mr. Butler said that he had viewed the whole of the bodies, but understood that the police wished an adjournment.

Inspector Miller: Yes, there is much evidence to collect. We would like an adjournment not earlier than the middle of next week.

Mr. Butler: Very well, I adjourn the inquest until Thursday next, January 7, at 10.30 o'clock. Is there any application for a jury.

Inspector Miller: No, but I believe one of the dead men was a member of the A.M.A.

Mr W. D. Barnett at this stage engaged the court and conversed with Inspector Miller, after which Mr. Miller stated that the A.M.A. did not ask for a jury. Three of the dead, he added, were members of the A.M.A.


LAST NIGHT'S SEQUEL.

GERMAN CLUB FIRED.

BY INCENSED CROWD.

PREMISES GUTTED.

MARCH TO THE CAMEL CAMP.

Following upon the terrible tragedy of yesterday morning; a turbulent crowd assembled in Argent-street last night and started upon a career of destruction.

At about 3 o'clock there was a big crowd, mostly of young men and youths in the vicinity of the Police Station. Exciting debates as to whether the perpetrators of yesterday's outrage were Turks, or Afghans, and whether or no they were set on to their awful work by Germans were taking place. Those who contended that the Germans were the authors of the outrage, were in the majority, and a few of the ringleaders raised the cry of "To the German Club, lads." The call needed no repetition. There was a ready response, and a mixed crowd of several hundreds made off towards Delamore- street where the headquarters of the German Club are situated.

"The crowd took up a stand in front of the premises, which, .appeared to be empty. Quickly, the scene became riotous in the extreme, as stones were hurled against the walls and through the windows, while the crowd alternately cheered or sang snatches of patriotic songs or gave loud tongue to terrible execrations on the heads of all foreigners, Germans, Turks, and Afghans in particular.

After a few minutes spent in this way, there was a dash towards the building, and some of the men forcing an entrance, caused considerable damage inside. These were, after a brief interval, called out, and others advanced, and apparently following a prearranged plan, scattered the contents said to be methylated spirits of two bottles in the front portion of the building. Lights were then applied. Flames at once shot upwards, and ignited the woodwork of the premises. In a few seconds, less time than it takes to write, the whole front of the building was one mass of fire, which was rapidly burning the contents and exterior woodwork, including the verandah.

Firemen Hooted.

When the fire was at its fiercest, and the heat from it was almost unbearable eren on the other side of the road, the fire brigade steamer with its crew arrived on the scene. The gable end of the adjoining house, owned by Mr. A. Marks, and occupied by Mr. D. Desmond, was then blazing, while the building on the other side of the club premises, Messrs. G. and R. Wills' warehouse, was threatened.

As the firemen drove up they were loudly hooted by a section of the crowd and there were cries of "Stop them!" "Don't let them put it out." The firemen were not, however, interfered with. They tackled the task of extinguishing the outbreak bravely. The call to the fire was received from street fire alarm box at 8.40, and the effectiveness of the firemen's methods was shown by the fact that the steamer was back at the station again at 9.10, one or two men being left, at the scene of the fire which was then practically extinguished. Two hoses were used, and a splendid pressure of water came from the Umberumberka mains. This helped the firemen considerably.

The club was, however, a ruin. The building was gutted, and a great part of the framework was destroyed. The roof of Messrs. G. and R. Wills' warehouse, was slightly damaged. Mr. Marks' cottage, a four-roomed wood and iron place, suffered worse damage, a portion of the gable end being much burnt. The contents of the place were badly damaged by removal. Mr. Desmond had no insurance on his property.

The crowd, which had listened to the counsel of wiser heads who pointed out that the club premises were in any case doomed, and that there was no need to allow adjoining property to be consumed, had ceased its hooting and spent the time looking on at the fight which the firemen were putting up against the flames. Sometimes a new part of the building caught, or a portion fell away, they cheered lustily, and sometimes they sang choruses, "Rule Britannia,'' "Australia," and others. In one part of the short street, there was trouble with an inebriated man who was heard to remark that the Australian boys (meaning the members of the citizen forces who were present) were no good. His remark was resented, and he was roughly hustled about, despite his declaration that he was an Australian born, but was eventually rescued by the police.

The officers of the law, with Inspector Miller at their head, handled the crowd well, and were greatly assisted by the military, a number of whom with bayonets fixed, helped to keep the crowd far enough away from the burning building to prevent the firemen being hampered in their movements.

As the fire died down under pressure of the stream of water that was being poured on to it and the crowd could see the wreck of the building, they seemed to be content with the damage executed, and moved off towards Argent-street with cries of "Now for the camel camp,"
"Let's settle the Afghans."


AFTER THE AFGHANS.

A LONG TRAMP FOR NOTHING.

They walked along Argent-street towards Iodide-street. No one seemed very enthusiastic, and the pace was slow. At the intersection or Argent and Iodide-streets, the police, half a dozen in number, spread across the road. Five hundred or so people came to a dead halt.

"Go home, like good fellows; you've done enough for to-night," said Sergeant Dimond. The other officers adopted a similarly persuasive course of action. But it was all without avail. The crowd did not seem to want to go home; neither did it seem keen on pushing forward. Numerous of its component units, however, were willing to argue, and they did argue, with the police and with anyone else who would listen. It was pointed out to them that they might get a warm reception at the camel camp. None of them were armed, while it was suggested that the Afghans would certainly be formidably armed and equal to protecting themselves.

In the midst of all the argument a hoarse voice chimed in, "Remember our women who were shot," This was repeated several times with alterations and additions. "More will be shot if the Afghans live," "The Germans will bribe some more of them to do their dirty work," "We're not safe while they're alive," were some of the remarks made. Remonstrance was useless. Efforts were made to convince the people that the Afghans were not Turks, and that it was Turks who were the perpetrators of the train outrage. It did not matter; Turk, Hindu, or Afghan - they were all much of a colour, and, therefore, branded.

And so the crowd flanked round into Iodide-street, 'but were again pulled up by the police. The arguments this time were not prolonged. After about a couple of minutes wait an armed detachment of the citizen forces (82nd Infantry) with engineers and civilian volunteers, came marching briskly along Iodide-street. They passed straight ahead, and were followed by a straggling crowd right up to the North Camel Camp. Here the military, under Lieut. Anderson, and the police headed by Inspector Miller, again joined forces. A cordon of armed men was stretched across the roadway and approximate to the camp fence, and no civilians were allowed to pass. At one time, there was a bit or rough play amongst the crowd, but no damage was done.

Gradually the crowd melted away, some, as they came, on foot and some in taxi-cabs, a number of which were in waiting, and did good business carrying loads of people between the camp and the city. Some of the troops remained on guard for the greater part of the night.


AT THE NORTH CAMEL CAMP.

A DEMONSTRATION AND A CHECK.

POLICE AND MILITARY FIRST ON THE SPOT.

The Asiatics' settlement at North Broken Hill is situated at the extreme northern end of Williams-street. The "camp" as it is called, consists of a few galvanised-iron buildings straggling irregularly around an area of two or three acres. The land here consists of blocks or allotments each one acre in area, like all the other residential land outside the central portion of the city.

Two or three of these areas are held by Asiatics. Here they live during the intervals of their periodical trips with their camels across country to the various stations and settlements to and from which they carry merchandise. It is here that their business depot is situated, and here their camels are to be found on their return from a trip except when they are sent adrift to graze on such feed, as may be obtainable on the surrounding land. The buildings are of a rude and flimsy character, the most substantial being the one that is used as a mosque. This place of worship is attended to by priests of the Mohammedan religion.

At half-past nine, all was perfectly still at and about the camp. There was not only no sign of disorder, but there was no sign even of life. Then a couple of motor cars drove up and stopped in the silent street. As the passengers jumped out of the cars, it was apparent at once that they had an object in view, and an urgent one.

A minute's observation was enough to show that they were on pressing business, and a closer view showed them to be a mixed body of police and armed military. The posse made its way straight across through the wire fences that surround and divide, the blocks of land, and went up by the back way to the enclosure which surrounds the mosque. Here two venerable figures appeared, picturesque in the moonlight, turbaned, robed, like bearded ancients, typical priests of Islam. Calm, silent, unperturbed, at the invasion of the sacred precincts of their place of worship, they stood there impassive
and unmoved. A man who accompanied the police party averred in strong terms that the Asiatics had a constable imprisoned within the building. Inquiry of the priests elected a calm denial. This denial was rejected, by the informant, and to set the question at rest it was decided to make a search. Entry was not opposed. Some went round to the back door. Two or three remained at the front door. These latter soon got tired of waiting, and one turned the handle of the door, which was not locked, and entered the building. The room they stepped into was about 20ft. long by about 15ft. wide. In the dimmest of light it could, be seen that on one side there was an alcove in the wall apparently for the reception of a sacred image or ceremonial vessels, or possibly as a praying stand. The floor was heavily carpeted, but apart from the carpet and one or two lamps, the room held no furniture. Those who entered had undoubtedly profaned the sacred building as they were not only unbelievers, but had marched in with their boots upon their feet.

On seeing that all was harmless within, the party returned, and then it was explained that the visit in force was not in consequence of the alleged seizure of a constable, but for a quite contrary; reason, viz, that the authorities feared a repetition of the proceedings that had taken place a little earlier in the evening, at the German Club, and had hurried a force to the scene to preserve order. The force was there none too soon. By the time the party which had visited the mosque had returned to the road where the cars were, after leaving a guard, near the buildings occupied by the Asiatics, a crowd apparently numbering some hundreds was seen surging down the road. But before they arrived opposite the camp, where the motor cars stood, the lights of which had drawn the crowd to that spot, a detachment of military had arrived. Lieutenant Anderson was in command, and Lieutenant Resch, area officer, had arrived on the scene with the police, and the advance guard in the cars. Lieut. Anderson rapidly formed his company in line, extended them a few paces apart, thus making the line equally as long as the extended front of the crowd and then marched them slowly across the road gently pressing back the massed line of angry civilians whose advent was the cause of anxiety to the authorities. There was every reason for anxiety. If the Afghans and half-Afghans who comprise the population of the camel camp had been attacked, and, their buildings wrecked as had been done in the case of the German Club building, there would most certainly have been a terrible retribution enforced by the Asiatics, upon their unarmed antagonists.

While the main body of the agitated crowd was held in check by the line of military, pickets were posted at all the other approaches to the Asiatics' buildings. These were alert, and instantly challenged and turned back all who approached the area of the camp. A cart containing two police and some civilians which came from the direction of Stephens Creek was inexorably held up by a couple of pickets, and compelled to make a detour clear of the disturbed area. One picket who was posted alone at the entrance to a lane leading off the street where the crowd was and which passes along, at the back of the Asiatics' camp, had his hands-full in stemming a strong disposition to push past him and had he been less determined there certainly would have been a breakaway at this point. But Lieutenant Anderson noticed the pressure and soon had the picket reinforced by several of his men, who were accompanied by constables, and this danger passed.

Gradually the inaction of waiting in idleness, had its effect, and about half an hour after, the crowd arrived it began to drift away. Soon the drift became general, and then the military and police were left in sole possession of the ground.


AUSTRIAN ASSAULT PROPOSED.

As the crowd considerably diminished, reassembled in Argent-street some time was spent in talking over the situation. The ringleaders then proposed a "visit to Crystal-street, with a view to making an attack on some houses there, occupied, or alleged to be occupied, by Austrians. The plan, however, got no further advanced than talking, and at a little after midnight, very few of the crowd remained in the streets.

 

  

Further Reading:

The Battle of Broken Hill, New South Wales, 1 January 1915

The Battle of Broken Hill, New South Wales, 1 January 1915, Roll of Honour

Australian Battles

Battles where Australians fought, 1899-1920

 


Citation: The Battle of Broken Hill, New South Wales, 1 January 1915, Barrier Miner Account

Posted by Project Leader at 12:01 AM EAST
Updated: Thursday, 6 January 2011 4:57 PM EAST

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