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Friday, 23 May 2008
9th LHR AIF War Diary, 23 May
Topic: AIF - 3B - 9 LHR

9th LHR, AIF

9th Light Horse Regiment

War Diary, 23 May

Pro Gloria et Honore - For Glory and Honour

Regimental March -  Marching Through Georgia

 

 

The following entries are extracted and transcribed from the 9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary, the originals of which are held by the Australian War Memorial. There are 366 entries on this site. Each day has entries as they occurred from 1914 to 1919. In addition to the 9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary, when appropriate, entries from the 3rd Light Horse Brigade War Diary and other regiments with the Brigade will also appear. Entries from the unit history, Darley, TH, With the Ninth Light Horse in the Great War, Adelaide, Hassell Press, 1924 will also appear from time to time. The aim is to give the broadest context to the story and allow the reader to follow the day to day activities of the regiment. If a relative happened to have served in the regiment during the Great War, then this provides a general framework in which the individual story may be told.

 

The Diary

 

1914

Saturday, May 23, 1914

See 4th Military District, South Australia for militia activities.

 

1915

Sunday, May 23, 1915

9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Walkers Ridge
9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary -
3rd Light Horse Brigade War Diary - 10th Light Horse Regiment to trenches Shrapnel Valley with 1st Light Horse Brigade.
Machine Guns placed under No. 3 Section of Defence. Visited trenches.

Carew Reynell Diary - To continue where I left off.

We remained on board the transport Minominee in Lemnos Bay on the night of the 20th and on the morning of the 21st we waited while the navy decided whether it was safe for the Minominee to go to Kape Tepe or whether we should be transhipped to small craft so as to be safer from the German submarines known to be in the vicinity. About 1000 it was definitely decided to send us up in small craft.

Two destroyers [Foxhound and Scourge] came long side about 2300 and 8th Light Horse Regiment less one Squadron and Brigade Headquarters left per Foxhound at about 0145 and our 9th Light Horse Regiment less “C” Squadron and the third Squadron of the 8th Light Horse Regiment and about 50 details left per Scourge about 0215.

Our third Squadron, “C” Squadron left along with the field Ambulance in a 3rd destroyer about an hour later.

We ran up to Kape Tepe at over 20 knots an hour but had to wait some time before disembarking. At about 1600 we were sent ashore in barges towed by pinnaces and were allotted the side of a precipice to live on. We climbed up and dug out ledges to sleep on and made ourselves moderately comfortable and safe for the night. Spent bullets and odd shells fell round us from time the destroyers came into the barges and either a bullet or a piece of a shell made a hole through our destroyer the Scourge close to the end of the barge I was in.

Perched up near the top of the cliff we had a lovely view from our dugout and admired the sunset behind the shipping in the offing consisting of warships, hospital ships, destroyers, trawlers etc and went to sleep with a regular whistle of spent bullets from over the trenches a mile inland like canaries over our heads. It kept some awake but as it gradually crescended and sank I didn't find it at all disturbing.

Just after breakfast a high explosive shell landed in the middle of “C” Squadron's part of the cliff. No damage.

At 1100 on 22 May we got orders to go at once and relieve the New Zealand Auckland Regiment in the trenches. The Trenches are like a rabbit warren and it took me till 1800 to get everybody settled down and get every man prepared to meet the various quips and cranks and merry jests that brother Turk is primed up with by his German confreres.

There are scores of dead men mainly Turks lying within twenty yards of some of these trenches and although most of them have been dead for nearly three weeks the stench is still very ripe.

They can't be buried as there are Turk snipers all round in the thick bush who pick off anybody who shows over the parapet. When I was looking round one trench that we were to relieve I suddenly came on a dead New Zealander in an advanced stage of decomposition that had been dragged into the trench by the New Zealand men with a crooked stick. It was a very unpleasant object and I was glad they had buried him by the time our men came to occupy the trench. By using the periscope one can see all round and we have plenty of them but men only look over to fire when a target has been marked down by means of the periscope. Our fellows have shot five Turks since occupying the trenches yesterday afternoon and are very keen on it. Two very keen members have shot two each.

Their snipers lay round in the bushes and it's very hard to mark them down and at night they come within a few yards and keep firing all night. Also a fire from their trenches, including machine guns, is kept up all night. It's a hideous waste of ammunition but apparently they have plenty of it.
Our next sheet is a plan of our trenches - those held by our men at Nos 3, 4, and 5 Saps. The dotted line between 3, 8, 4 Saps won't be finished till tomorrow night. Until then Turks can and do get in between them for sniping. Turk's Point is only occupied by us at night. Yesterday afternoon, 22 May, there was great excitement among the shipping since a German submarine came in among them. Destroyers dashed here and there at a devil of a pace and all the big ships cleared out at their very best pace and made for Lemnos.

There has been a German aeroplane cruising about over us all this morning and we have got no naval guns now to help us - all warships at Lemnos - we expect the Turkish artillery to be pretty accurate tonight.

1630 They have just started but are shelling the beach and bivouac so far - must go out and have a look and see if they are getting decent practice at all.

I am writing while lying on my back in our dugout measuring 5 foot 6 inches by five foot floor by five foot high in which the Colonel and Adjutant and self sleep.

The Colonel is not himself yet and has to take things steadily. Our feeding is top hole and besides army biscuit, we have bacon and bully beef and jam and cheese and rum and tobacco including cigarettes. We are quite safe here, comparatively, with care and we can hear the shells coming in time to duck.

There are a lot of stray bullets from snipers but they don't seem to hit many. The Turks shell us for about an hour in the morning and another hour in the afternoon but as I say, with certain care, it's a very harmless proceeding. They have been making general attacks on the trenches from time to time but none since Tuesday last. We hear they have been heavily reinforced so expect some fun soon.

 

1916

Monday, May 22, 1916
9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Roadhead Serapeum
9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - Lieutenants Nelson and Robertson returned to duty from School of Instruction, Zeitoun.

 

1917

Wednesday, May 23, 1917
9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Goz Mabruk
9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - Point 680 near U of cUltivated was reached at 0400 and the Brigade then moved to Abu Yahia the 8th Light Horse Regiment as advance guard. Touch was gained with enemy patrols in vicinity of 840 but on our advance they withdrew.
The Regiment assigned to reserve throughout the day. In vicinity of 840 one Squadron moving forward about one mile to support of the 8th Light Horse Regiment.
At 1600 the order was received to withdraw to the ridge cove
ring El Buggar to cover the withdrawal of the Brigade. This was completed by 1700 and the column moving back to El Gamli, the 8th Light Horse Regiment forming the rear guard. Horses watered in the wadi and the Brigade bivouacked on the west bank. Scott, Lieutenant Colonel WH, DSO, rejoined the Regiment from hospital.
 

1918

Thursday, May 23, 1918
9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Auja Bridgehead defences
9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - Cruddas, Lieutenant GF; and, two Other Ranks proceeded to School of Instruction, El Arish.
Sharp, Lieutenant RC, with A Troop of “A” Squadron patrolled to Square 127F20a.
One deserter surrendered to his patrol. Patrol came under heavy fire from Square 127F16b.
North east patrol shelled for about two hours during morning.
Nine remounts arrived.

 

1919

Friday, May 23, 1919
9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Tel el Kebir
9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - Routine.
Kildea, Lieutenant FJ; and, Aikman, Lieutenant GE, both reported to Brigade Headquarters.
1530, Tod, Lieutenant PA; and, patrol returned.

 


Previous: 9th LHR AIF War Diary, 22 May

Next: 9th LHR AIF War Diary, 24 May

 

Sources:

See: 9th Australian Light Horse Regiment, Contents
Australian Light Horse Studies Centre, AIF War Diaries of the Great War, Site Transcription Policy

 

Further Reading:

9th Light Horse Regiment AIF

Bert Schramm Diary

9th Australian Light Horse Regiment, Roll of Honour 

Battles where Australians fought, 1899-1920

 


Citation: 9th LHR AIF War Diary, 23 May

Posted by Project Leader at 12:01 AM EADT
Updated: Monday, 26 July 2010 10:24 AM EADT
Thursday, 22 May 2008
Great War Issues, Lest We Forget - But We Did Anyway, Andrew James Marshall
Topic: GW - We forgot

Great War Issues

Lest We Forget - But We Did Anyway

Andrew James Marshall 

 

The death of Andrew James Marshall 

[Adelaide Observer, 3 October 1914, p. 43.]

 

ANDREW JAMES MARSHALL –  A FORGOTTEN SOLDIER

Researched and written by: Brian Fallon from Geelong, Victoria; and, Chris Ward, who lives in Adelaide, South Australia.

 

INTRODUCTION

The death and burial of James Marshall was reported in Adelaide and Broken Hill newspapers in September 1914 and even though it was reported that he was a member of the A.I.F. his name is not commemorated as a war dead.   Early research failed to find evidence of A.I.F. service, however, the chance discovery of incorrectly filed Service Papers for 595 Pte John Thomas Marshall of ‘E’ Company, 12th Battalion provided the vital breakthrough to prove that the deceased was a serving member with the A.I.F. when he died.        

 

NEWSPAPER REPORTS

From the Adelaide Observer, 3 October 1914, p. 43.
The First Death

It was reported at camp headquarters on Sunday that Pte James Marshall, of E Company, 12th Infantry Regiment, who had been sent to the Adelaide Hospital suffering from pneumonia, had died on Saturday. Pte Marshall was a single man, aged 28 years, and came from Broken Hill. He was a member of the unit raised in South Australia to complete the Tasmanian quota of the 12th Infantry Regiment, but was indisposed at the time of the departure of his comrades for Tasmania.


The Register, Adelaide and The Barrier Miner, Broken Hill newspapers reported the death of James Marshall on the 28th September 1914 followed the next day by a report of his funeral.   Collectively they reported that Marshall was from ‘E’ Company, 12th Battalion, was single, aged 28, was from Broken Hill and among the mourners was a brother, Charles, from Kapunda, South Australia.   He was given a military funeral, the firing party and pallbearers drawn from ‘H’ Company, 10th Battalion.   

 

ADELAIDE HOSPITAL ADMISSION RECORDS

Adelaide Hospital Admission Records show that John Marshall from Morphetville, probably Morphetville Camp, was admitted on the 17th September 1914 suffering from pneumonia and that he died on the 26th September 1914, the same date that James Marshall died.  There is no doubt that John and James were the same person.  

 

DEATH CERTIFICATE

The death certificate for James Marshall records that he was a Miner from Broken Hill, was aged 28, single and was born in Naracoorte, South Australia. The informant, undertaker R. G. Trevelion, would not have known the deceased and the details were probably provided either by Charles Reuben Marshall, brother of the deceased who attended the funeral, and/or the army.          

 

595 PTE JOHN THOMAS MARSHALL, ‘E’ COMPANY, 12th BATTALION

The enlistment papers, four pages, for 595 Pte John Thomas Marshall, ‘E’ Company, 12th Battalion who enlisted on 5 September 1914 were found by chance incorrectly filed in the service dossier for 559 Pte James Thomas Marshall, 32nd Battalion. The latter is not related in any way to the James Marshall being investigated. The papers, including a ‘Certified Copy of the Attestation Paper,’ reveal that 595 Pte John Thomas Marshall, age 29 years and 9 months, 5 feet, 5 ½ inches tall, was born in Naracoorte, South Australia. In answer to Question 11 he stated that he had been a member of the 8th A.I.R., Bendigo and named his sister, Mrs. H. Ramsey of Mardan South, Gippsland, Victoria, next of kin.   Harriet Jewel Marshall married William James Ramsey in Victoria in 1904.   With positive identification of three siblings, Charles, Harriet Jewel and John Thomas, it was established that they were born in Naracoorte, South Australia to Robert and Catherine (nee Harris) Marshall. It is significant that a son, James, is not included, however there is an Andrew James.

With the connection between John Thomas, Charles and Harriet established it is clear that 595, John Thomas Marshall was the John Marshall admitted to the Adelaide Hospital on 17 September 1914 and therefore the James Marshall who died in Adelaide Hospital on 26 September 1914.  

 

1470 PTE JOHN THOMAS MARSHALL, 10th BATTALION
          
John Thomas Marshall enlisted on 18 December 1914 as 1470, 10th Battalion.  His enlistment papers show that he was born in Naracoorte, was aged 27 years and 7 months and his brother, Charles of Kapunda, South Australia, was named next of kin.   In answer to Question 11 he stated that he had no previous military service.  This soldier was four inches taller than 595 Pte John Thomas Marshall.       

 

THE REAL JOHN THOMAS MARSHALL

Only one of the two volunteers who enlisted under the name of John Thomas Marshall could be the one so named born on 12 May 1887.   1470 Pte John Thomas Marshall survived the war and married in London in before returning home. His actual age when he enlisted on 18 December 1914 is within six days of his stated age of 27 years and 7 months clearly identifying him as the real John Thomas Marshall, son of Robert and Catherine Marshall.  

 

THE MARSHALL FAMILY      

Of the eight sons born to Robert and Catherine Marshall three have not been accounted for. Three died in infancy: Alexander Mark in 1884 and Thomas and Thomas Harris both in 1883. Charles Reuben, John Thomas and Richard Harris served in WW1 and returned home.   Two of the names unaccounted for; Robert and William Beard have not been traced but because of their age are not likely to have been the person who enlisted as 595, John Thomas Marshall. This leaves Andrew James whose age at 5 September 1914 agrees very closely with the age recorded on the Attestation Paper for 595 Pte John Thomas Marshall.  

 

ANDREW JAMES MARSHALL

Andrew James Marshall was born at Naracoorte, South Australia on 19 November 1884 and it is believed that he was known as James.   He married Bertha Elsie Adeline Thompson at Bendigo, Victoria on  9 June 1909, where their two children were born: Elsie Jean 1910 and Edith Kath 1911. For both births, the father’s correct name, Andrew James Marshall, was recorded. As mentioned above the person who enlisted as 595 Pte John Thomas Marshall stated that he had served in the 8th Australian Infantry Regiment, Bendigo, interesting considering that Andrew James Marshall was living in Bendigo from at least 1909 to possibly 1913.   The family then moved to Cobar, New South Wales where a third child, Amy, was born in 1913. Sometime later it is believed that Andrew James Marshall moved to Broken Hill, possibly without his family, where he identified himself as James.         

Comparison of Andrew James Marshall’s signature on his marriage certificate to that on the Attestation Paper for 595 Pte John Thomas Marshall would have confirmed if these two people were or were not the same person. Unfortunately the Attestation Paper being a certified copy does not have the original signature thereby precluding a comparison. The original document cannot be found.   

 

ELECTORAL ROLLS

1909 – Bendigo, Victoria.   Shows a James Marshall, occupation Miner, residing at 302 Woodward Road, Golden Square. With Andrew James Marshall having married in Bendigo in 1909 it is strongly believed that this James Marshall was Andrew James Marshall.

1913 –  Cobar, New South Wales. Shows Andrew James Marshall, occupation Miner.  His wife, Bertha Elsie Adeline Marshall, is on the same electoral roll.     

1915 – Broken Hill, New South Wales. Shows James Marshall, occupation Miner, living in Crystal Street. Being registered on the 1915 electoral roll does not necessarily mean that James Marshall was living there in 1915. By comparison, 477 Pte Frank Batt, 10th Battalion who enlisted on 24 August 1914, is on the same electoral roll even though he left Adelaide on 20 October 1914 and was killed in action on 25 April 1915. Both men probably registered on the Broken Hill electoral roll in 1913 or 1914.    

The electoral rolls in themselves do not prove that James Marshall and Andrew James Marshall were the same person.  However,  it seems to be too much of a coincidence that a James Marshall happened to be in Bendigo in 1909, where Andrew James married that year, and then in 1913 Andrew James Marshall was living in Cobar with his wife. It is known that the deceased was from Broken Hill when he enlisted and it is reasonable to accept that he was known there as James, the name on the Broken Hill and Bendigo electoral rolls.

 

12TH BATTALION

The 12th Battalion was a composite unit comprising: four companies, ‘A’, ‘B’, ‘C’ and ‘D’ formed in Tasmania, ‘E’ and ‘F’ Companies formed in South Australia and ‘G’ and ‘H’ Companies formed in Western Australia. On 16 September 1914 ‘E’ and ‘F’ Companies left Adelaide for Melbourne where they embarked on 17 September 1914 aboard HMAT A2 "Geelong" for Tasmania leaving 595 Pte John Thomas Marshall, believed to be Andrew James Marshall, in the camp hospital administratively isolated from his unit. He died at Adelaide Hospital on 26 September 1914 and, with the 12th Battalion having departed, men from ‘H’ Company, 10th Battalion formed the firing party and served as pallbearers, probably because ninety-five of the men in that Company were from Broken Hill many of whom would have known the deceased.     

 

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA GAZETTE

The War Pensions Act 1914 required that the death of serving members of the armed forces be promulgated in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette with Gazette Number 36 dated 8th May 1915 the only one that records the names of members of the A.I.F. who died prior to embarkation. Neither John Thomas Marshall nor James Marshall are not listed, the first entry being 527 Pte John William Poole, 10th Battalion who died two days after Marshall in Adelaide Hospital, as detailed in the article extracted from the Observer posted above. Had the South Australian contingent of the 12th Battalion been in Adelaide at the time of Marshall’s death it’s possible that the correct procedures would have been followed and his name subsequently listed in Gazette Number 36.  
 

GRAVE

James Marshall’s unkempt and unmarked grave, West Terrace Cemetery, Adelaide, Number 43, Road 1 South, Path 7 West, photograph taken in 2005.  

 

PROBABLE SEQUENCE OF EVENTS

It will never be known exactly what took place after 595 Pte John Thomas Marshall, ‘E’ Company, 12th Battalion enlisted at Morphetville Camp on 5 September 1914, however, it is possible to draw certain conclusions based on the evidence available. Some time after enlisting he was admitted to the Morphetville Camp Hospital but with his health deteriorating he was admitted to the Adelaide Hospital on 17 September 1914 as John Marshall, dangerously ill from pneumonia. It is likely that the 12th Battalion notified his next of kin, his sister Mrs. H. Ramsey of Mardan South, Gippsland, Victoria, of his condition while he was in the camp hospital. She in turn notified a brother, Charles Reuben, living in Kapunda, South Australia who visited the hospital expecting to find his brother, John Thomas, only to identify the patient as his brother James. It is not known if Charles saw his brother at the camp hospital or at the Adelaide Hospital or even before he died. Hospital staff would have notified the army of Marshall’s death, possibly Headquarters, Keswick Barracks, 4th Military District, or the Australian Army Medical Corps and the 10th Battalion was directed to provide men for the firing party and pallbearers. Once that commitment was completed the 10th Battalion would have had no requirement to follow up with administrative procedures. Failure to follow the correct procedures resulted in Marshall’s name not being promulgated in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette that resulted in his name being overlooked as a war dead.         

 

CONCLUSIONS

1.    The James Marshall who died in Adelaide Hospital on 26 September 1914 was, at the time of his death, serving as 595 Pte John Thomas Marshall of ‘E’ Company, 12th Battalion having enlisted on 5 September 1914.  

2.    For the following reasons it is believed that it was Andrew James Marshall, known as James, who enlisted as 595 Pte John Thomas Marshall on 5 September 1914:

(i) His whereabouts or fate after 1913 cannot be confirmed although it is believed that he was the James Marshall recorded on the 1915 Broken Hill Electoral Roll.   
(ii) His age on 5 September 1914 agrees within sixteen days of the age recorded on the Attestation Paper for 595 Pte John Thomas Marshall.
(iii) The Attestation Paper for 595 Pte John Thomas Marshall records that the volunteer admitted to having served in the 8th Australian Infantry Regiment, Bendigo and it is known that Andrew James Marshall was living in Bendigo at least between 1909 and 1913.   


RECOMMENDATION

1.    The name of Andrew James Marshall to be commemorated as a war dead or something similar.

 

Further Reading:

Lest We Forget - But We Did Anyway

The Light Horse

Battles where Australians fought, 1899-1920

 


Citation: Great War Issues, Lest We Forget - But We Did Anyway, Andrew James Marshall

Posted by Project Leader at 9:27 PM EADT
Updated: Sunday, 31 January 2010 10:32 AM EAST
Great War, South Australian History, The Critic, 23 September 1914
Topic: Gen - St - SA

Great War

South Australian History

The Critic, 23 September 1914

 

GOOD SAMPLES OF SOUTH AUSTRALIAN SOLDIERS.

[Left to right: Lieut.-Col. F. Rowell, Lieut.-Col. A. Miell, Major D. Fulton, and Lieut. Lewis.]

 

One thing that is noticeable when undertaking research is that many things sound the same regardless of the time-line. To illustrate this situation, below are a couple pages from the Adelaide Critic. The pages are from September 1914 but the subjects are completely contemporary.

Here are the issues discussed:

  • The soldiers are doing a wonderful job;
  • The water shortage due to the prolonged drought;
  • How the opposition can support the government;
  • The union monster that is destroying Australia and the ALP; and,
  • Train mismanagement.

Think this is all new? Think again. 

 

THE CRITIC.

September 23, 1914.

Head Office:
GRESHAM STREET, ADELAIDE.
Commercial Department,
'Phone 687.
Melbourne Office: Mr. T. A. Rogers,
"EMPIRE;' FLINDERS STREET.
'Phone 4960 Central
The Editor is prepared to consider contributions in the form of short stories and sketches, verse, paragraphs, &c. Artists in black and white are invited to submit pictures. All matter submitted (except pars.) will be acknowledged in correspondence column. Unsuitable matter returned when stamps are sent, but the Editor will not guarantee preservation or safe carriage of same.
RATES OF SUBSCRIPTION.
"The Critic" will be posted to any address in the Commonwealth or New Zealand at following rates:
Yearly (in advance) .. .. £1 0 0
Half-yearly (in advance) .. 0 12 6
Quarterly (in advance) .. 0 6 6
Extra postage to other countries, 6/6 per annum, and pro rata for shorter periods.
 
TO ADVERTISERS.
Advertisements must reach this office by Tuesday morning of each week to ensure inclusion in that week's issue. Alteration in advertisements must be made on Saturday preceding issue in which such alteration is to appear.

 
Town Topics

SOUTH AUSTRALIA AND THE WAR.

In a most dramatic and impressive manner the people of Adelaide were brought into intimate touch with the great European situation on Monday afternoon. The march of the Expeditionary Force through the streets, a demonstration, however, with which Kitchener might not have wholly agreed, stirred the grim side of the people's imagination as well as the depths of their patriotism. Here were their own "boys" going forth to do battle for the Empire's honor. Here was Australia's answer to a self-imposed call that she should shoulder some of the burden of a great responsibility. There was a thrill in a study of that long line of khaki, and a lump came to the throats of the onlookers as they thought ahead a few months and saw them taking their places in the far-flung fighting line with the British, the French, and the Belgian soldiers. Intermingled with the enthusiasm for the gallant South Australians who are going to risk all for their country's prestige, were many serious moments. That was why the large crowd of spectators did not give way to hilarious cheering, although there were, of course, expressions of the heartiest appreciation. It was not an occasion, after all, for hysterical rejoicing, but for sober contemplation and a robust, thoughtful sentiment. These soldiers were not going to Europe for a picnic or for comedy, but for a perilous duty. Some, we knew, would not come back, but with untold thousands would have to pay tragic toll to the God of Battles. It seemed terrible to think-and yet the awful possibilities were there-of any of those manly Australian hearts sleeping and their bodies rotting in the trenches because a single European monarch had run amok and had caused his men to turn almost the entire Continent into a vast ocean of blood.
There was one cause for rejoicing as that brave line of khaki swept through the streets. It was that the advance of the Allies and the retreat of the German Army were proceeding steadily towards a happy and decisive conclusion. The news from the front continues to be eminently encouraging, and while we may still expect reverses and checks, it seems that an all-enveloping victory is assured for the Allies and for honor.
 
THE WATER DIFFICULTY.

After sympathising with themselves, the public of the metropolitan area will, to some extent, sympathise with the Government in connection with the water difficulty. It is a serious, almost an alarming one. The position has to be looked squarely in its menacing face. A water famine is imminent and everybody will agree with the action of Sir Richard Butler in instituting prosecutions against those who have persistently neglected the warning given by the department that none of the precious fluid was to be used for the gardens. This intimation was prominently notified and should have been instantly respected. No doubt, many people have imagined that this was a cry of "Wolf! Wolf!" on the part of the authorities, but, unfortunately, it is no such thing.
The regulation is perfectly clear and there must be no monkeying with it. The watering of gardens is absolutely prohibited.
That means, as the Commissioner of Public Works has pointed out, that no moisture is to be applied to them by any method or by subterfuge. There has been a silly and criminal attempt by certain householders to make the regulation a solemn farce by throwing water on to the gardens by means of a bucket instead of a hose because Sir Richard had stated the objection in that popular way. The gardens are not to be watered at all. Now, is that plain enough: The Minister in future does not intend to limit the prosecutions to those who are caught squandering the golden contents of the reservoirs through a hose. And, of course, it is not necessary for the consumers to be actually caught in the act. The meter tells a sufficient tale. Every day the trouble is becoming more acute. September is passing-there are only six more days to go and there has been practically no rain to speak of. The most that we can hope for is a replenishing supply from the effect of the equinoxial gales which occur towards the end of the present month or early in October. If that should fail, the residents of the metropolitan area will be faced with a water famine on a scale never before approached. The only advantageous feature about the problem is that it is forcing private people to do what they should have done before-getting water independently of the reservoirs.

 

A BUNGLE SOMEWHERE.

But what is the Government water department doing? Is it to be presumed that the experts are not sitting idly by during this crisis and waiting, like some criminal Micawber, for rain to turn up? Surely not. The public are entitled to have enough confidence in those officials to believe that they have in their minds some practical scheme to alleviate the terrible difficulty if the worst should come to the worst: It is an easy matter to blame somebody over this unhappy development, but it certainly does seem that the Hydraulic Engineer's Department has not looked far enough ahead, inn its calculations. There appears to have been a bungle somewhere in having allowed such enormous quantities of water to be wasted, when, with a drought, which is always possible in Australia, it must have been inevitable on the estimates of quantities stored in the reservoirs that a perilous position lurked near. The development of the suburbs, the accompanying extension of the sewage system, and the tremendous increase in the number of gardens, were facts_ quite visible to the untrained eye of the layman, and they should have been far more significant lessons to the officers charged with the responsibility of reckoning up the available supplies of the reservoirs as against these new and opposing factors. It is not hard to imagine what an immense saving could have been effected if the order to stop street watering by public bodies had been given long ago, and if similar action had been taken in respect of the quantities used by such institutions as the Botanic Gardens and the Zoo. From whatever view the trouble is examined there hardly seems to be any escape from the assertion that the-Hydraulic Engineer's Department has, all this time, been lulling itself into a false security. The capacity of the reservoirs has been unfairly and unwisely attacked.


WHAT IS BEING DONE?

But all that belongs to the unfortunate past. Regrets or mistakes cannot help us now. The position in which the residents of Adelaide and its environs are face to face with a water shortage probably more serious than any in their history has to be met. "The Critic" repeats that it is to be presumed that the danger is not being allowed to take care of itself. There ought to be some provisioning against the worst coming to pass-as it might very easily do. No expense which would lead to relief of a famine would be too great. Suggestions from those not cognisant with the technical considerations of the Hydraulic Engineer's office might be very absurd, but it does occur that provision could be made to direct some of the water from comparatively close reservoirs to metropolitan centres. That may not be feasible from an engineering standpoint. Neither may the proposal that the Murray should be drawn upon for supplies. But, in heaven's name, something ought to be feasible. It is obvious now that the Millbrook scheme should have been inaugurated long ago. No blame in that direction, however, can be laid. at the door of the present Government, and most certainly not on Sir Richard Butler's unfortunate head. Practically everything that has been 1 possible in the time has been done. Whether or not the scheme should have been recommended by the officers of the Hydraulic Engineer's Department much earlier is quite another matter.

 

"ASSISTING" THE GOVERNMENT.

When the war drums were first sounded and the battle flag was unfurled, there was a patriotic scene in the House of Assembly. The members, so the newspapers reported, sang lustily "God Save the King," gave several cheers for the King and Australia, and at a later stage some of them indulged in highly patriotic speeches. Among .them was the Leader of the Opposition, Mr. Crawford Vaughan, who then promised, presumably on behalf of his party, to give the Government all the assistance possible during-the crisis. That promise appears to have died away with the cheers. The patriotism of the Labor Party in South Australia has grown stale. Instead of assisting Mr. Peake and his colleagues of the Ministry in these delicate circumstances, the Socialists - or most of them - have, for petty party purposes, deliberately baulked and embarrassed them. It would have been a low down game at any time. There is no term fitted for publication that can be used to describe what this action amounts to at present.

The militant section of the Labor Party has been whipping up the unemployed and suffering proposition with great energy. There is no virtue in the clamor, or sincerity of pathos, no genuine indignation. Instead of assisting the Ministry to dispense practical sympathy on the unfortunate people, the Labor members are out to win political kudos. That and nothing more. They are harassing the Government right and left and making a difficult position infinitely more difficult by fanning, a sentimental flame. 'The Premier was perfectly justified in telling the Socialists in the House of Assembly the other day that that was the kind of assistance the Ministers would far sooner be without. The patriotism of the Labor Party is a treacherous alliance, and is not wanted. Let Mr. Vaughan and his associates keep it. This "loyal assistance" of theirs is mere humbug and sham and party deception. And they know it.

 

NOISE AND FROTH.

What point, it may be asked, could the Government have in deliberately aggravating the unemployed problem-, What right has the Labor Party got to arrogate to itself the supreme virtue of being the only one to be able to do the right thing in any given set of circumstances, Why should it claim a monopoly of this trumpeted virtue of sentiment' The Premier has repeatedly told the people that the Government is doing its best in connection with this difficulty, and the people may rely upon that best being all that is reasonably possible against -very heavy odds. In any case, as Mr. Peaks has emphasised, the South Australian Liberal. Ministry is doing, on the whole, much more than the New South Wales Labor Ministry. Mr. Peaks and his colleagues are at least keeping on deck while the storm is on, and that much cannot he said for the others. From the noise and froth that are issuing from the mouths of certain local Socialists it would seem that the Government is doing absolutely nothing to alleviate the distress. The Labor members are always able to cultivate convenient memories. They appear to have forgotten the prompt and splendid action on the part of the Government which has been responsible for keeping 2,000 men in work on the Peninsula Mines. Does that amount to nothing? Does the substantial assistance to the distressed farmers in the Far North and the West Coast amount to nothing? Is the determination of the Government to avoid, until the absolute limit of impossibility, the necessity for putting more Government employees on reduced time amount to nothing. The Commissioner of Public Works, who is at least an industrious and conscientious administrator, has thrown out the challenge that the party politicians who are protesting against the supposed inactivity of the Ministry cannot place a finger on a single instance of neglect to push on with public works. No, they cannot do that. But, if the occasion should be necessary, the Socialist imagination is a vile thing. Its party prejudice is even viler. Why, the Government is spending money on public works at the rate of quite £3,000,000 during the present financial year_ What the Labor agitators are after is what has been capitally described by Sir William Irvine as "soup kitchen" financing. They will not get it from Mr. Peaks or Sir Richard Butler.

LOOSE HEADS AND LOOSE TONGUES.

The remark of the Attorney-General in reference to the unions using some of their funds to alleviate distress is by no means extravagant. It may be pertinently enquired how the wealth of the labor organisations is being distributed. The reason why the criticism has been so hotly resented is that Mr. Homburg has put his finger on a sore spot. The fact is that the money which is extracted from the workers for the unions is not intended for their relief at all, valuable as it would be in a time like this. It is intended for the maintenance of labor newspapers which don't pay, and to enable the political agitators to draw their rather handsome salaries. That is where the money goes, and it is because the labor members cannot deny the truth that they are losing their heads and their tongues at the same time.

RAILWAY MIS-MANAGEMENT.

It was publicly known that thousands would throng the streets of Adelaide on "Monday to farewell the troops, and see the procession. From all parts of the suburbs the crowds came-and what did the railway authorities do? Did they put on more trains? No. Did they add more carriages' No. Did they study the convenience of the public at all? No. It is a fact that at many stations crowds could not be accommodated, and where second-class passengers travelled first, excess fare was demanded. Where was the justice or common-sense of it?

 

The largest crowd ever seen in Adelaide, Monday, 21 September 1914

 [Editorial Note: This is the crowd that arrived in Adelaide about which the last article on Railway Mismanagement was written. Since this was the era without Port-a-loos, fast food outlets and rapid transit, the management of basic human necessities at this event requires some imagination.]

 

Further Reading:

Great War, South Australian History

Great War, August 1914

Battles where Australians fought, 1899-1920

 


Citation: Great War, South Australian History, The Critic, 23 September 1914

Posted by Project Leader at 5:21 PM EADT
Updated: Monday, 26 July 2010 10:00 PM EADT
9th LHR AIF War Diary, 22 May
Topic: AIF - 3B - 9 LHR

9th LHR, AIF

9th Light Horse Regiment

War Diary, 22 May

Pro Gloria et Honore - For Glory and Honour

Regimental March -  Marching Through Georgia

 

 

The following entries are extracted and transcribed from the 9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary, the originals of which are held by the Australian War Memorial. There are 366 entries on this site. Each day has entries as they occurred from 1914 to 1919. In addition to the 9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary, when appropriate, entries from the 3rd Light Horse Brigade War Diary and other regiments with the Brigade will also appear. Entries from the unit history, Darley, TH, With the Ninth Light Horse in the Great War, Adelaide, Hassell Press, 1924 will also appear from time to time. The aim is to give the broadest context to the story and allow the reader to follow the day to day activities of the regiment. If a relative happened to have served in the regiment during the Great War, then this provides a general framework in which the individual story may be told.

 

The Diary

 

1914

Friday, May 22, 1914

See 4th Military District, South Australia for militia activities.

 

1915
Saturday, May 22, 1915
9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Anzac Cove
9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - Regiment commenced to relieve the Auckland Mounted Rifles on Walkers Ridge.
Relief completed by 1400, Saps 3, 4, and 5. In Section IV under Brigadier General Russell, New Zealand and Australian Division.
3rd Light Horse Brigade War Diary - 9th Light Horse Regiment to trenches Walker's Ridge. Visited trenches.

Carew Reynell Diary - No entry.

 

1916

Monday, May 22, 1916
9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Roadhead Serapeum
9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - Lieutenants Nelson and Robertson returned to duty from School of Instruction, Zeitoun.

 

1917

Tuesday, May 22, 1917
9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Tel el Marakeb
9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - Brigade Operation Order No. 29 received. Intention of the operation being to destroy the Turkish railway between Asluj and Auja. The role of the Imperial Mounted Division being to attract the attention of the enemy at Bir el Saba from the raid on the railway line.
Ayliffe, Lieutenant SH, in charge of 26 Other Ranks from the 8th, 9th and 10th Light Horse Regiments reported to Brigade I/C Field Troop for duty with demolition party.
The Regiment [strength 18 Officers 325 Other Ranks 358 horses] moved out at 1630 and proceeded with the 10th Light Horse Regiment to Abasan el Kebir where horses were watered and the rest of the Brigade joined.
The Brigade moved off at 1900 to Goz Mabruk where the wadi was crossed.
 

1918

Wednesday, May 22, 1918
9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Auja Bridgehead defences
9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - Stood to arms at 0330.
The strenuous work of the past few weeks and the unhealthy surroundings of the Jordan Valley now commenced to affect the health of the Regiment.
Beale, Captain JCM, Regimental Medical Officer, with his medical staff were having a strenuous time.
“B” Squadron were being treated daily for a week with anti-malarial treatment.

 

1919

Thursday, May 22, 1919
9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Tel el Kebir
9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - Routine. Gibney, Lieutenant BK, proceeded to El Rimal to relieve Aikman, Lieutenant GE. Hannaford, Lieutenant E, proceeded to Abu Sueir to relieve Kildea, Lieutenant FJ.
Regimental cricket team under McDonald, Captain JM, beat AIF Headquarters. Scores AIF headquarters, all out for 89, 9th Light Horse Regiment, 7 wickets for 203 runs, highest score made by Mosey, 1680 Trooper PG, 9th Light Horse Regiment, 85 runs not out.

 


Previous: 9th LHR AIF War Diary, 21 May

Next: 9th LHR AIF War Diary, 23 May

 

Sources:

See: 9th Australian Light Horse Regiment, Contents
Australian Light Horse Studies Centre, AIF War Diaries of the Great War, Site Transcription Policy

 

Further Reading:

9th Light Horse Regiment AIF

Bert Schramm Diary

9th Australian Light Horse Regiment, Roll of Honour 

Battles where Australians fought, 1899-1920

 


Citation: 9th LHR AIF War Diary, 22 May

Posted by Project Leader at 12:01 AM EADT
Updated: Monday, 26 July 2010 10:23 AM EADT
Wednesday, 21 May 2008
9th LHR AIF War Diary, 21 May
Topic: AIF - 3B - 9 LHR

9th LHR, AIF

9th Light Horse Regiment

War Diary, 21 May

Pro Gloria et Honore - For Glory and Honour

Regimental March -  Marching Through Georgia

 

 

The following entries are extracted and transcribed from the 9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary, the originals of which are held by the Australian War Memorial. There are 366 entries on this site. Each day has entries as they occurred from 1914 to 1919. In addition to the 9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary, when appropriate, entries from the 3rd Light Horse Brigade War Diary and other regiments with the Brigade will also appear. Entries from the unit history, Darley, TH, With the Ninth Light Horse in the Great War, Adelaide, Hassell Press, 1924 will also appear from time to time. The aim is to give the broadest context to the story and allow the reader to follow the day to day activities of the regiment. If a relative happened to have served in the regiment during the Great War, then this provides a general framework in which the individual story may be told.

 

The Diary

 

1914

Thursday, May 21, 1914

See 4th Military District, South Australia for militia activities.

 

1915
Friday, May 21, 1915
9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Lemnos then Anzac Cove
9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - 1000 Headquarters, A and “B” Squadrons embarked in destroyer Scourge and left for Kaba Tepe. “C” Squadron embarked on Scorpion and followed. Machine Guns remained on board the transport.
1600 Transhipped from destroyers on to boats about 300 yards from the shore. Landing then carried out under shrapnel fire - no casualties. Regiment bivouacked in gully.
(Note: This reference to the 9th LHR MG is somewhat confusing when the entry of the 9th May outlines that the machine gunners had embarked with the 3rd LH bde that day. Just what or who these machine gunners were is a bit of a mystery. It is unlikely that the 9th gunners would have been evacuated to Mundros before this date and maybe these machine gunners referred to were reinforcements.)
3rd Light Horse Brigade War Diary - Arrived and disembarked. Attached to New Zealand Brigade.
Light Horse Gully.
Digging in.
9th Light Horse Regiment relieved New Zealanders in trenches, Walker's Hill.

Carew Reynell Diary - No entry.

 

1916

Sunday, May 21, 1916
9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Roadhead Serapeum
9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - Routine work. Training including musketry, bayonet fighting and mounted work. Swimming Parade to Canal, 1 Squadron daily.

 

1917

Monday, May 21, 1917
9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Tel el Marakeb
9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - The Regiment undertook routine work for the day.
System of medical inspections commenced to endeavour to check the spread of septic sores.
 

1918

Tuesday, May 21, 1918
9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Auja Bridgehead defences
9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - Stevens, Lieutenant WJ, proceeded to Divisional Intelligence Officer

 

1919

Wednesday, May 21, 1919
9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Tel el Kebir
9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary - Usual camp routine. Scott, Lieutenant Colonel WH, CMG DSO; and, Nankervis, Lieutenant LF, went to inspect posts at Abu Sueir and El Rimal. McDonald, Captain JM; and, 14 Other Ranks proceeded to Cairo to play AIF Headquarters cricket.

 


Previous: 9th LHR AIF War Diary, 20 May

Next: 9th LHR AIF War Diary, 22 May

 

Sources:

See: 9th Australian Light Horse Regiment, Contents
Australian Light Horse Studies Centre, AIF War Diaries of the Great War, Site Transcription Policy

 

Further Reading:

9th Light Horse Regiment AIF

Bert Schramm Diary

9th Australian Light Horse Regiment, Roll of Honour 

Battles where Australians fought, 1899-1920

 


Citation: 9th LHR AIF War Diary, 21 May

Posted by Project Leader at 12:01 AM EADT
Updated: Monday, 26 July 2010 10:26 AM EADT

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The Australian Light Horse Studies Centre is a not for profit and non profit group whose sole aim is to write the early history of the Australian Light Horse from 1900 - 1920. It is privately funded and the information is provided by the individuals within the group and while permission for the use of the material has been given for this site for these items by various donors, the residual and actual copyright for these items, should there be any, resides exclusively with the donors. The information on this site is freely available for private research use only and if used as such, should be appropriately acknowledged. To assist in this process, each item has a citation attached at the bottom for referencing purposes.

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