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Friday, 12 December 2008
Foster Mirror - War Declared
Topic: GW - August 1914

 

13 August  1914, War is Declared, Foster Mirror

Due to the time zone differences, the declaration of war by Britain against Germany, while officially recorded as 4 August 1914, in terms of Australia, did not happen until Wednesday, 5 August 1915. For the Foster Mirror, this did not happen until a week later, on Thursday, 13 August 1914.

Apart from being a major regional agricultural and forestry area, the South Gippsland region supported minor military training facilities. The Militia formations throughout the region included: Foster Rifle Club; Toora Rifle Club under the command of Captain RH Downing; Welshpool Rifle Club; Leongatha, 46th Australian Infantry Regiment,  "E" Company (part);and, Leongatha Rifle Club.

Foster was a regional centre which boasted of a bi-weekly newpaper. On Monday, it was the Foster and Toora Mirror incorporating the South Gippsland Shire Advocate, while on Thursday, it was just the Foster Mirror incorporating the South Gippsland Shire Advocate. It was priced at 3/- [3 shillings or in 2008 AUD, $60.84] per quarter. The newspaper was circulated around the South Gippsland region from Leongatha to Welshpool. Apart from some of the most breathtakingly beautiful forests and rural landscapes dotted by wonderfully rustic villages and hamlets, the area contains the natural wonder known as Wilson's Promontory. The following two pages are indicative of the life experienced in Gippsland when the Great War was declared.

War is Declared

This page explores the way the Foster Mirror dealt with the news.

Foster Mirror, Thursday, 13 August 1914, p. 2.

[Click on page for larger version -  1.056mb]

Patriotic Meeting

The lead story deals with a patriotic meeting held at Toora. The meeting was organised by one Jabez Richards, a former veteran of the Boer War. He ran a dairy farm at Toora and during the Boer War, served as a Private with the 3rd Victorian Bushmen embarking to South Africa on 10 March 1900 and returned to Australia, 6 June 1901.

At the meeting, the following motion was put:

That we now offer ourselves to serve as light horse or infantry in the Commonwealth, and would suggest that the proposed corps be used for the protection of the coast from Leongatha to Port Albert, a nucleus being started in Toora.

Proposed by Major HA Jacobs and seconded by Captain RH Downing.

A number of names were put forward of men who wanted to volunteers. They were:

Bert Hall, K McLellan, A Morgan, A Whitely, A. Crouch, H Thomas, V Warrington, CL Fox, L Pearce, L Baker, and Major HA Jacobs.

During the first flush of enthusiasm, many men who nominated to serve were not able to do so.  While the meeting envisaged 100 men volunteering in a Militia capacity, 64 men did volunteer to serve with the AIF. 16 men did not return home again. One man, Arthur Randolph Trimnell made a place for himself by taking part in one of the more romanticised aspect of the Great War, the Charge at Beersheba. The men are listed below with the unit they enlisted in and their ultimate fate.

Men from Toora who served with the AIF

11755 Gunner Harold Percy Foers, Field Artillery Brigade 2, Reinforcement 14, Returned to Australia.
27458 Gunner Daniel Martin Ireland, Field Artillery Brigade 2, Reinforcement 20, Roll of Honour.
10617 Gunner William John Squire, Field Artillery Brigade 2, Reinforcement 13, Roll of Honour.
6275 Gunner Andrew Swan, Field Artillery Brigade 4, Head-Quarters, Returned to Australia.
22823 Gunner Walter Darchy Mason, Field Artillery Brigade 7, Reinforcement 1, Returned to Australia.
20074 Gunner Edwin James Cyril Bryant, Field Artillery Brigade 8, Battery 32, Roll of Honour.
35052 Gunner Edgar Hector Guest Barrett, Field Artillery Brigade, Reinforcement 27, Returned to Australia.
34992 Gunner Thomas Brown Lovat Fraser, Field Artillery Brigade, Reinforcement 27, Returned to Australia.
38949 Gunner Arthur Ernest Bradly, Field Artillery Brigade, Reinforcement 33, Returned to Australia.
29767 Gunner Alfred George Pearce, Howitzer Brigade 119, Returned to Australia.
32064 Gunner Ronald Herbert Edwards, Howitzer Brigade 22, Reinforcement 10, Roll of Honour.
4849 Private James Harkness Knight, 14th Battalion, 15th Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
1412 Private William Robert Silcock, 14th Battalion, 1st Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
618 Private Frederick Burgh Ker, 22nd Battalion, C Company, Returned to Australia.
5651 Private Henry Victor Olsen, 22nd Battalion, 15th Reinforcement, Roll of Honour.
3639 Private Leonard Smith, 23rd Battalion, 8th Reinforcement, Roll of Honour.
1861 Private Norman Ireland, 31st Battalion, 2nd Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
2186 Private Reginald Woorayl Barratt, 37th Battalion, 3rd Reinforcement, Roll of Honour.
1165 Private Robert John Cameron, 37th Battalion, D Company, Roll of Honour.
1183 Private Alfred William Foxon, 37th Battalion, D Company, Returned to Australia.
1361 Private Henry George Morphett, 39th Battalion, D Company, Returned to Australia.
1384 Private John William Rice, 39th Battalion, D Company, Returned to Australia.
2386 Private Charles Seton, 3rd Pioneer Battalion, Reinforcement 3, Returned to Australia.
1941 Private Ernest Martyn Ker, 46th Battalion, 3rd Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
3103 Private Edwin John Silcock, 57th Battalion, 8th Reinforcement, Roll of Honour.
2016 Private Harry Walker, 57th Battalion, 3rd Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
3250 Private William Henry Wintle, 57th Battalion, 8th Reinforcement, Roll of Honour.
3116 Private Harry Carlton Busby, 58th Battalion, 8th Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
2204 Private Alfred Norman Milburn, 58th Battalion, 4th Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
4731 Private Alexander Annand, 5th Battalion, 15th Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
4136 Private William John Bishop, 5th Battalion, 13th Reinforcement, Roll of Honour.
702 Private George Thomas Dale, 5th Battalion, D Company, Roll of Honour.
Second Lieutenant Harold Dunstan George Ferres, 5th Battalion, 9th Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
2843 Private Sidney James Humphrey, 5th Battalion, 9th Reinforcement, Roll of Honour.
5419 Private Reginald George Page, 5th Battalion, 18th Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
3120 Private Samuel Henry Cameron, 60th Battalion, 8th Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
2886 Private William Truscott, 6th Battalion, 9th Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
2129 Private Leslie Robert Curram, 7th Battalion, 6th Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
2793 Private Edwin Walter Gasson, 7th Battalion, 9th Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
2232 Private William Michael James Guilfoyle, 7th Battalion, 6th Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
3089 Private Laverick Hope Mcleod, 7th Battalion, 10th Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
2497 Private Charles Edward Rooney, 7th Battalion, 7th Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
Second Lieutenant John Kenneth Sorrell, 8th Battalion, 25th Reinforcement, Roll of Honour.
55691 Private Norman Abel Spokes, 7th General (Victorian) Reinforcements, Roll of Honour.
17346 Private Alfred Nailer Jacobs, Army Medical Corps February 1917 Reinforcements, Returned to Australia.
4620 Private Thomas Donald Dale, Light Horse General Service Reinforcements, February 1918, Returned to Australia.
791 Private Walter Atkin, Machine Gun Company 2, Reinforcement 15, Roll of Honour.
680 Private David Leslie Liddell, Machine Gun Company 6, Reinforcement 12, Returned to Australia.
611 Private Charles James Warner, Machine Gun Company 6, Reinforcement 10, Returned to Australia.
53089 Private Frank Rodgers, Queensland Reinforcement 2, Returned to Australia.
6118 Private Robert Wallace Lee, Tunnelling Companies, December 1916 Reinforcements, Returned to Australia.
6119 Private Roy Edward Lee, Tunnelling Companies, December 1916 Reinforcements, Returned to Australia.
5385 Sapper Arnold Blandeston Mason, 7th Field Company Engineers, Reinforcement 2, Returned to Australia.
2997 Trooper Percy Bucknall, 4th Light Horse Regiment, 22nd Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
1681 Trooper William Lamb, 4th Light Horse Regiment, 12th Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
1264 Trooper Arthur Ernest Peterson, 4th Light Horse Regiment, 9th Reinforcement, Roll of Honour.
2389 Trooper Arthur Randolph Trimnell, 4th Light Horse Regiment, 16th Reinforcement, Charged at Beersheba, Returned to Australia.
3049 Trooper Wilfred James Binding, 8th Light Horse Regiment, 23rd Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
2584 Trooper Nathan Clark, 8th Light Horse Regiment, 18th Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
707 Trooper Albert John May, 8th Light Horse Regiment, 2nd Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
488 Trooper Ernest Singleton, 9th Light Horse Regiment, C Squadron, Returned to Australia.
1943 Trooper Cyril Crameri, 13th Light Horse Regiment, 12th Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.
158 Trooper Harold John Curram, 13th Light Horse Regiment, C Squadron, Returned to Australia.
1788 Trooper Albert Edward Smith, 13th Light Horse Regiment, 9th Reinforcement, Returned to Australia.

 

Letters to the editor

Letters to the editor reveal as much about the thoughts of the time as do advertisements. Two letters deal with issues that seem local but are indicative of the social mood prevailing at the time.

Letter #1:

PF Sterling of St Mary's in Yarram writes about sectarianism. It would appear that an anti-Catholic rumour was passed around suggesting that the Catholics would unite and vote as one block in the up coming Federal elections. Mr Stirling's assurance could easily be given as even the notion of such a voting caucus is preposterous. However, it does give a window into the paranoia that existed at the time which induced Mr Sterling to write such a letter.

Letter #2:

On more mundane matters, the letter of Mr GY Hendy regarding the Foster Rifle Club reveals some real problems involved in mobilisation of the AIF. He reports that the Foster Rifle Club has been ordered to cease any rifle practice and to hand in all available ammunition. This is an interesting insight into the the Militia status of the Rifle Club movement. Ammunition and rifles were supplied to rifle clubs by the Department of Defence for the purposes of training men to shoot. An order relating to the return of ammunition implies that there was a shortage of ammunition for AIF troop purposes. The only reservoir of ammunition readily available at short notice was through the rifle clubs.

The second issue raised in the Hendy letter related to drilling the members into proper military drill. At the time, specific members of the Australian Instructional Staff had been allocated to participate in drill training members of the rifle clubs. The letter reveals that when reality met theory, there was a great shortfall. At least one member of a rifle club had to be trained in the fundamentals of military drill and that at meetings, military drill was part of the activity conducted by the rifle club. Mr Hendy reveals that in the reality, no one at the Foster Rifle Club trained to be a drill instructor and so, the military drill part of their program slid away or was never invoked during the period leading up to the Great War.  

Foster Activities, 13 August 1914

While the war announcement was a significant story, the life of South Gippsland did not halt but just kept going on, as it did for the duration of the war. This page details quite clearly some of the life that occurred within the south Gippsland region.

 

 Foster Mirror, Thursday, 13 August 1914, p. 3.

[Click on page for larger version -  1.088mb]

 

Market Train

The important economic indicator of the region was the train service. The market train from Foster to Leongatha was scheduled to depart from Foster at 9am on Thursday 13 August. It was all stops from Foster to Leongatha which included the towns of Hoddle Range, Fish Creek, Boys, Buffalo, Stoney Creek, Meeniyan, Tarwin, Koonwarra. The Market Train was the key export infrastructure that extracted the produce from the region and moved it to the markets where the commodities were sold. This train was the key piece of infrastructure responsible for maintaining the economic wealth within the region. Mundane though it may appear, it is often the mundane that is the key to prosperity and success.

Leongatha Labor Colony

Illustrative of the mundane playing a key role in economic success was the news that the Leongatha Labor Colony exported 500 cases of apples to Glasgow over the 1913/14 financial year. At an average price of 10/- per case, the income was about £2,500 or in 2008 AUD, $100,000.

The story that lies behind the Leongatha Labor Colony is even more intriguing. The following summary is an entry from the book by RCS Trahair called Utopias and Utopians: An Historical Dictionary, (1999), p. 235:

LEONGATHA LABOR COLONY.

Leongatha Labor Colony was the most successful of many utopian experiments during the 1893 depression in Victoria, Australia. It belonged to an antiutopian tradition of employing workhouse labor. A heavily timbered site, eighty miles southeast of Melbourne was chosen to establish the colony. It was to be supported by public subscription and sale of produce, but instead it had to he subsidized by the government (1893-1898). The colony mainly existed to give unemployed men temporary work at subsistence wages. Middle-class Melhournians saw the colony was a utopian lifestyle for the undeserving poor, while the poor saw it more as an English workhouse. The colony was not self-supporting as planned. and skilled agricultural labor had to be brought in. In its first year the average stay was about three months. Altogether nearly 3.500 unemployed people and families settled communally in Leongatha. In April 1903 the colony was closed by government proclamation. When poverty did not disappear the venture was reproclaimed in 1904. It offered a cheap way to ensure that men did not starve. Men were dismissed from the colony as soon as they had earned £2. The colony cost the government almost £21,000 and helped 9,300 people over twenty-six years. It ceased in May 1919, the government took it over for veterans of World War I, and the land was given to soldiers who had served the British empire.

The region was part of some radical solutions to major social problems of the time, facts which underly the story within the Foster Mirror.

The history revealed by a newspaper

A newspaper is a historical snapshot of a particular area on the day the newspaper was published. They contain a wealth of information which can be extracted and used according to the individual taste. The above extracts give an example of the depth of information contained within a simple rural newspaper. Every story contains many more stories, each layered upon each other like onion peels. As one peels away one skin, more appear to reveal a vibrant community brimming with history.

Do you want to take part in uncovering and writing Australian history?

If this entry or other entries inspires you to produce further insights, please feel free to post a response and it may become an acknowledged part of the article.

 

Further Reading:

Complete list of Newspaper References for 5 August 1914

 


Citation: Foster Mirror - War Declared

Posted by Project Leader at 7:27 PM EAST
Updated: Saturday, 13 December 2008 7:56 PM EAST
Thursday, 11 December 2008
Albury Daily News - War Declared
Topic: GW - August 1914

 


5 August  1914, War is Declared, Albury Daily News

Due to the time zone differences, the declaration of war by Britain against Germany, while officially recorded as 4 August 1914, in terms of Australia, did not happen until Wednesday, 5 August 1914. 

Apart from being a major regional agricultural service centre, Albury was also the first home to Duntroon and also supported other major military training facilities. The Militia formations at Albury Wodonga included: the 43rd Australian Infantry Regiment,  "F" Company;  the Australian Field Artillery, 4th Battery; and, the Albury Rifle Club.

Albury was a major regional centre which boasted of a daily newpaper, the Albury Daily News which incorporated the Wodonga Chronicle. It was priced at 1d [one penny or in 2008 AUD, $1.70] and was circulated around the area. The following two pages are indicative of the life experienced in Albury the day the Great War was declared.

War is Declared

This page explores the way the Albury Daily News dealt with the news.

Albury Daily News, Wednesday, 5 August 1914, p. 2.

[Click on page for larger version -  839kb]

The stories contain many complaints about British censorship. However, despite that it makes a valient effort to produce news that appears not to be at hand.

Loyalty was a significant theme with stories of the Irish in Great Britain and the Germans in Australia. The South Australian German community was some 10% of the state's population and thus was a significant consideration in any Australian response to a war against the German nation. 

The stories that the newspaper can confirm deal with a hoax in Melbourne and a run on the banks in Sydney. These are hauntingly familiar scenes. After the tragedy of 9/11, abundant hoaxes occurred bringing into being anti-hoax laws. The hoax in Melbourne was quite elaborate requiring quite a bit of planning. The run on the banks has brought forward similar problems experienced as a consequence of the collapse within the financial community forcing the governments to guarantee deposits. Now as then, to ensure the stability of the banks, the government guarantee of deposits was an essential policy response. Nothing changes despite the elapse of 95 years.

Albury Activities, 5 August 1914

While the war announcement was a significant story, the life of Albury did not halt but just kept going on, as it did for the duration of the war. This page details quite clearly some of the life that occurred within Albury.

 

 Albury Daily News, Wednesday, 5 August 1914, p. 3.

[Click on page for larger version -  1.121mb]

 

 

Dame Ellen Terry

 

Here we see that  entertainment was cancelled for unstated reasons.  Dame Ellen Terry, GBE (1847 - 1928) was a famous English stage actress specialising in Shakespearean theatre.  In 1914, Terry toured Australia lecturing and reciting on Shakespearean heroines. The reason for the cancellation might well have been for health reasons for Dame Terry suffered from cataracts in both eyes. After touring Australia she went to America where she underwent an operation to remove the cataracts. Apparently the operation was only partially successful. The fact that Ellen Terry was in Albury was a significant cultural coup.

 

Maud Allen

 

Maud Allan as the sensuous Salomé dancing around the head of John the Baptist.

Maud Allan (1873? - 1956)  was born Beulah Maude Durrant who made a career as a pianist, actress, dancer and choreographer. In 1906, Maud Allen became famous or infamous, for her dance interpretation of Oscar Wilde's play, Salomé. Her Dance of the Seven Veils became so well known it still resonates as an adult burlesque theme. As for Maud Allen, she was from then on known by the sobrequet of "The Salomé Dancer".

The connection with Maud Allen? Very tenuous but the Albury Daily News was not going to miss out on their story. Mr Howard Edie, the manager for Maud Allen was in Albury to make arrangements for the Cherniavsky Brothers to perform in Albury on Friday, 19 August 1914. The Cherniavsky Brothers were a stage act performing in the Maud Allen show that was on stage at that moment in Brisbane but would open in Adelaide later that month.

The Cherniavsky Brothers pianist Jan, cellist Mischel and violinist Leo, 1904

The Cherniavsky Brothers included violinist Leo, pianist Jan and cellist Mischel, were young men from Minsk who began their stage career in 1904. After the loss of Dame Terry, this was another cultural high point for Albury.   

On the more mundane

Nice Steaky Breakfast Bacon is 1/3d per pound or in 2008 AUD, $55.11 per kilo. Mate and Co Butchers were also selling Beef sausages at 8d per pound or in 2008 AUD, $29.39 per kilo. Very expensive meat then and now.

The Hume Shire was calling for tenders to clear 19-50 chains (382m - 1km) on the Balldale-Howlong Road. Albury Council was looking at installing pipes in the culverts near the Globe Hotel in Dean Street. [Dean Street was and still is the main throughfare of Albury which now contains the cappucino strip and shopping malls.] Another contract was for the forming and gravelling of Jones Street. This may seem routine, and it is, but it is this work the kept Albury and surrounding areas operational upon which the governments predicated their ability to support the troops overseas. The ability to do so came back to infrastructure projects such as these, mundane but very necessary.

Hire Purchase

Abe Nathan, 1906

Abe Nathan's furniture store was another historical institution in Australia. In 1872, the 16-year old Abe Nathan left the East End of London with
10/6 in his pocket worked his passage to Melbourne. He worked for his brother Samuel's furniture business for about 10 years before
striking out on his own with a furniture store at 225 Chapel Street in Prahan, Melbourne. Abe Nathan was very successful with a new method of obtaining customers which he did by offering hire purchase contracts. He was the first business to offer the working man the ability to furnish the humble home from 2/6 per week.

Abe Nathan's association with Albury began after 1908 with the land boom. On speculation, he freighted furniture to Albury for auction. The results exceeded his expectations resulting in him relocating to Albury. Abe Nathan settled in Albury and then expanded his business throughout the Riverina.

The history revealed by a newspaper

A newspaper is a historical snapshot of a particular area on the day the newspaper was published. They contain a wealth of information which can be extracted and used according to the individual taste. The above extracts give an example of the depth of information contained within a simple rural newspaper. Every story contains many more stories, each layered upon each other like onion peels. As one peels away one skin, more appear to reveal a vibrant community brimming with history.

Do you want to take part in uncovering and writing Australian history?

If this entry or other entries inspires you to produce further insights, please feel free to post a response and it may become an acknowledged part of the article.

 

Further Reading:

Complete list of Newspaper References for 5 August 1914

 


Citation: Albury Daily News - War Declared

Posted by Project Leader at 8:45 PM EAST
Updated: Saturday, 21 April 2012 11:16 PM EADT
Tuesday, 19 August 2008
Port Lincoln, August 1914
Topic: GW - August 1914

Dale and Follett enlist. 

West Coast Recorder, 2 September 1914, p. 2.

Harry Stuart Campbell DALE

Boer War Service

Number    142
Rank    Trooper
Unit    4 (IMPERIAL BUSHMEN) CNTGNT
State    SA
Murray page number    360
Notes    Invalided to Australia, arr. 17/12/1900

Great War Service

Regimental number    283
Religion    Church of England
Occupation    Railway clerk
Address    Care of Mrs. Wald, Hill Street, North Adelaide, South Australia
Marital status    Single
Age at embarkation    34
Next of kin    Mrs. Jessie Dale, care of Mrs. Andrews, Grant avenue, Toorak, South Australia
Enlistment date    19 August 1914
Rank on enlistment    Private
Unit name    3rd Light Horse Regiment, B Squadron
AWM Embarkation Roll number    10/8/1
Embarkation details    Unit embarked from Adelaide, South Australia, on board HMAT A17 Port Lincoln on 22 October 1914
Rank from Nominal Roll    Private
Unit from Nominal Roll    3rd Light Horse Regiment
Fate    Discharged 7 February 1916

National Archives Service File 

Granted a commission in the Monmouthshire Regiment as a Second Lieutenant where he served to the end of the war. He returned to South Australia and took up employment as a clerk with the Bank of Adelaide.

"Tot" Follett

Follett was never attested. He went to Adelaide and returned to Port Lincoln on the next ship.


Citation: Port Lincoln, August 1914 


Posted by Project Leader at 5:32 PM EADT
Updated: Friday, 10 October 2008 11:28 PM EADT
Monday, 18 August 2008
Burglary at Launceston, 28 July 1914
Topic: GW - August 1914

The big news from Launceston on 6 August 1914 was not the declaration of war by Britain two days before, but of a burglary that involved the injury of a police officer.

The sensational burglary at Rankin and Bond's Brass Foundery, 136 Cimitiere St, Launceston.
The Weekly Courier, Thursday, 6 August 1914, p. 8.

The foundery was a flourishing business and thus one of note in Launceston. Here is what the Cyclopedia of Tasmania, 1900 had to say upon this business. Extract from Volume 2, pp. 120-1:

Mr. W. Foster, brassfounder

Mr. W. FOSTER, Brassfounder and Finisher, (136) Cimitiere Street, Launceston. This old established firm was started by Mr. (Robert) Ikin, who came from Sydney, and carried it on for eighteen months, when Mr. FOSTER became a partner in the business. On the death of Mr. Ikin, Messrs. Bond and Carr managed the business for the trustees to the estate, and finally in 1893 Mr. FOSTER purchased it. The business is in a very flourishing condition, and a large increase of accommodation and an extensive addition to the plant have been necessary in order to meet the wants of customers. Mr. FOSTER has erected new premises close to the old ones in Cimitiere Street, at a cost of about £800, and has laid out £200 in additional machinery, including a new Otto gas engine working up to 31/2 horsepower. Six hands are constantly employed, but as the business is still increasing, more assistance will be necessary in the immediate future. The firm supplies the fittings, main water cocks, etc., for the Government, Gas Company, Corporation of Launceston, and the Electric Light Company, and is now supplying one ton of bolts for the new steel yacht being built for Messrs. Gunn and Stephenson, while an order has just been completed for Mr. G. Harrap for bolts, port lights, and all fittings connected with ship work and engineering of a new steamer built by Mr. Moore. The firm also manufactures engineers' and plumbers' fittings for steam and water of every description to order; also sluice nozzles for mines, etc. Mr. FOSTER's endeavour is, by constant attention to customers and turning out good work, to compete with foreign markets. He has followed this rule successfully in the past, and there is every reason to believe that even more satisfactory results will be obtained in the future. Mr. FOSTER is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He has little time for pleasure, his business occupying the greater part of his time: but he has been fond of the gun as well as hunting.

The former foundary, now long since gone, was located at 136 Cimitiere Street, about half way between Tamar and George Streets in Launceston city and very close to City Park. The complexion of the city has changed. Some of the older industrial buildings have made way for newer constructions although Albert Hall on the corner of Tamar and Cimitiere is a relic from that era of industrialisation. In contrast to the glass fronted shops, there are some wonderful old worker's terraced houses that are now considered to be trendy addresses amongst the upwardly mobile attracting rents commencing from about $500 per week. Things have changed.

But Launceston hasn't altered too much in its values. That makes this article all the more reflective of the communal values at the time. They appear very provincial and parochial. This was not common to Launcestion but very much an Australian phenomena.


Citation: Burglary at Launceston, 28 July 1914

Posted by Project Leader at 2:08 PM EADT
Updated: Monday, 18 August 2008 2:13 PM EADT
South Australian Coastal Shipping, August 1914, part 2
Topic: GW - August 1914

Coastal Steamships Limited

Catering for a more specialised market, the Coastal Steamships Limited introduced innovations to their shipping packages. 


Coastal Steamships Limited Shipping Schedule

Adelaide Advertiser, Monday, 3 August 1914, p. 1.

The outstanding item is concentration upon the local passenger market. Their ticketting agressively seeks after this trade. The value added items include the train to either Port Adelaide or Glenelg, allowing passengers the option of choosing their point of departure from Adelaide itself with a comprehensive ticket. With luggage, it was quite a difficulty getting to the ports unassisted. This ticket provided a one stop service which proved to be very popular.


Citation: South Australian Coastal Shipping, August 1914, part 2 


Posted by Project Leader at 12:19 PM EADT
Updated: Saturday, 20 September 2008 6:11 PM EADT

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