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The Poetry of Palestine.
The Poetry of Palestine. 
 

Western Mail, Thursday 9 March 1933, page 2

The Poetry of Palestine.

There was a gallant Camelier, whose name was Patsy Murphy,
And every time he told a tale, the boys said; "It's a furphy."
Now, Murphy found a camel, and he thought it was a trier;
And when he tried its paces, sure, it proved to be a flier.
So he christened it with whisky, and he called it "The Galoot,"
And entered it for the Camel Cup, way down at Assiut.

This poem, called "What's in A Name" by Major Oliver HOGUE aka Trooper Bluegum, was extracted from the The Kia ora coo-ee. Here is the complete poem.

What's in A Name.

There was a gallant Camelier, whose name was Patsy Murphy,
And every time he told a tale, the boys said, "it's a furfy."
Now, Murphy found a camel, and he thought it was a trier;
But when he tried its paces, sure, it proved to be a flier.
So he christened it with whisky, and he called it "The Galoot,"
And entered it to win the Camel Cup down at Assiut.
The boys were in no hurry
To back it for the scurry,
But Murphy didn't worry, for Murphy bagged the loot.

The Camel Corps swung Eastward to the wilds of El Arish,
But Murphy, sure, was stony broke—all his feloush mafish.
So when the sports came round again, Pat Murphy saw his chance,
He called his camel "Onward," and he led the books a dance;
They'd never heard of "Onward", so they gave him ten to one,
But Murphy had them thinking, at the setting of tne sun.
For "Onward" proved a winner,
For the books it was a skinner;
Pat had whisky with his dinner, sure, the world was made for fun.

In course of time the "Fighting First" went down to Ferry Post;
The boys all started training with the hacks they fancied most,
But to the sports a camel came which set the old hands guessing,
They seemed to know the animal, but not the name, "Mange Dressing".
But Murphy wasn't far away, he risked his last piastre,
And still the camel stood to him and saved him from disaster.
It was just as he intended, For when the day was ended, Some camels were just splendid, but "Mange Dressing" travelled faster.

Now, every dog must have his day, but Murphy's day lasts years,
He seems to have the luck of half-a-dozen Cameliers;
For when the I.C.C. camped in the Land of Milk and Honey,
Pat Murphy and his camel won another pot of money.
We all had speedy camels that we fancied for the trot;
The Quack was fast, Starlight was fine, and Strychnine was red hot.
But Murphy made a hit, With his mount— now "Kabait", For the brute was simply IT, it's time the brute was shot.

Palestine. Trooper Bluegum.

Those in the story:

Trooper Bluegum = Major Oliver HOGUE, a 34 year old Journalist from The Mall, Glebe Point, Sydney, New South Wales, who enlisted in the AIF on 16 September 1914 and was allotted to the 2nd Light Horse Brigade, Headquarters which embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board Transport A29 Suevic on 21 December 1914. After the Great War he Died of disease, 3 March 1919.