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Tuesday, 10 February 2009
Troop transport ships
Topic: AIF - Misc Topics

Ships that moved an Army

Australian military shipping, 1914 - 1919

 

His Majesty's Australian  Ship [HMAS]

Rarely happening but Australian naval vessels were employed in transporting small numbers of reinforcements from Australia to a theatre of war.

 

HMAS Encounter

HMAS Encounter

 

The HMAS Encounter weighed 5,880 tons with an average cruise speed of 21 knots or 39.9 kmph. It was a Challenger Class light cruiser Commissioned on 10 December 1905. It remained in service until disarmed and renamed Penguin in 1923 and scuttled at Bondi in 1932.

HMAS Encounter Embarkations

 

HMAS Una

HMAS Una

 

The HMAS Una was a captured (10 October 1914) German yacht called the KGS Komet. It weighed 977 tons with an average cruise speed of 18 knots or 33.33 kmph. After the Great War it was occasionally impressed into service and was finally broken up in 1959.

HMAS Una Embarkations

 

His Majesty's Australian Transports [HMAT] Ships

A fleet of transport ships was leased by the Commonwealth government for the specific purpose of transporting the various AIF formations to their respective overseas destinations. When not committed to military transport, these ships were employed to carry various commodity exports to Britain and France. The fleet was made up from British ships and  captured German vessels.

 

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HMAT A1 Hymettus

HMAT Hymettus at the Gulf of Suez

[From: AWM C02548.]

The HMAT A1 Hymettus weighed 4,606 tons with an average cruise speed of 11.5 knots or 21.3 kmph. It was owned by the British India SN Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 15 May 1917.

 

 

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HMAT A2 Geelong

HMAT A2 Geelong at Hobart, 20 October 1914

[From: West Coast Recorder, 19 November 1914, p. 23.]

HMAT A2 Geelong weighed 7,851 tons with an average cruise speed of 12 knots or 22.22 kmph. It was owned by the P&O SN Co, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until it collided with SS Bonvilston in the Mediterranean and sunk, 1 January 1916.

 

 

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HMAT A3 Orvietto

HMAT A3 Orvieto embarking from Melbourne, 21 July 1914

[From: The Australasian, 21 November 1914, Picture Supplement, p. I.]

HMAT A3 Orvieto weighed 12,130 tons with an average cruise speed of 15 knots or 27.78 kmph. It was owned by the Orient SN Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 29 December 1914. It formed part of the first convoy of the AIF to the Egypt. The Orvieto became well known for its work during this convoy as it transported the prisoners captured from the beached German raider Emden. The German prisoners were take to Egypt by the Orvieto for imprisonment.

 

 

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HMAT A4 Pera

HMAT A4 Pera, Tasmania, Hobart, 1915-16
 
[From: AWM A03211]

HMAT A4 Pera weighed 7,635 tons with an average cruise speed of 11 knots or 20.37 kmph. It was owned by the P&O SN Co, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 6 January 1917. The Pera was torpedoed and sunk in Mediterranean on 19 October 1917

 

 

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HMAT A5 Omrah

HMAT A5 Omrah

The HMAT A5 Omrah weighed 8,130 tons with an average cruise speed of 15 knots or 27.78 kmph. It was owned by the Orient SN Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 10 February 1915. The Omrah was torpedoed and sunk in Mediterranean, 12 May 1918.

 

 

 

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HMAT A6 Clan Maccorquodale

HMAT A6 Clan Maccorquodale

[From: AWM P01122.003]

The HMAT A6 Clan Maccorquodale weighed 5121 tons with an average cruise speed of 15 knots or 27.78 kmph. It was owned by the Cayser, Irvin and Co., Glasgow, and leased by the Commonwealth until 14 April 1915. The Clan Maccorquodale was torpedoed and sunk in Mediterranean, 17 November 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A7 Medic

White Star Liner HMAT A7 Medic leaving Fremantle, 2 November 1914.

[From: The Western Mail, 20 November 1914, p. 25.]

The HMAT A7 Medic weighed 12,032 tons with an average cruise speed of 13 knots or 24.07 kmph. It was owned by the Oceanic SN Co Ltd, Liverpool, and leased by the Commonwealth until 26 October 1917. The Medic was well known by the Australian forces as it was a key troopship for Australia during the Boer War, some 14 years before the re-engagement.

 

 

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HMAT A8 Argyllshire

HMAT A8 Argyllshire

The HMAT A8 Argyllshire weighed 10,392 tons with an average cruise speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. It was owned by the Scottish Shire Line Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 24 January 1918.

 

 

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HMAT A9 Shropshire

HMAT A9 Shropshire at Port Melbourne, Victoria, 11 May 1917.
 
[From: AWM P01843.001]

The HMAT A9 Shropshire weighed 8,130 tons with an average cruise speed of 15 knots or 27.78 kmph. It was owned by the Federal SN Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 5 August 1917.

 

 

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HMAT A10 Karroo


HMAT A10 Karroo at Port Melbourne, Victoria, 18 September 1916.
 
[From: AWM PB0504]

The HMAT A10 Karroo weighed 6,127 tons with an average cruise speed of 12 knots or 22.22 kmph. It was owned by the Ellerman & Bucknall SS Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 3 January 1917.

 

 

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HMAT A11 Ascanius


HMAT A11 Ascanius at Port Melbourne, Victoria, 27 May 1916.
 
[From: AWM PB0127]

The HMAT A11 Ascanius weighed 10,048 tons with an average cruise speed of 13 knots or 24.07 kmph. It was owned by the Ocean SS Co Ltd, Liverpool, and leased by the Commonwealth until 30 July 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A12 Saldanha

HMAT A12 Saldanha

[From: State Library of NSW, picture number a639516]  

 

The HMAT A12 Saldanha weighed 4,594 tons with an average cruise speed of 11 knots or 20.37 kmph. It was owned by the Ellerman & Bucknall SS Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 14 June 1917. The Saldanha was torpedoed and sunk in Mediterranean, 18 March 1918.

 

 

 

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HMAT A13 Katuna

HMAT A13 Katuna at Gallipoli unloading troops, 1915.

[From: AWM P00437.001]

The HMAT A13 Katuna weighed 4,641 tons with an average cruise speed of 11 knots or 20.37 kmph. It was owned by the Ellerman & Bucknall SS Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 10 February 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A14 Euripides

HMAT A14 Euripides, 1919

[From: AWM P03987.001]

The HMAT A14 Euripides weighed 15,050 tons with an average cruise speed of 15 knots or 27.78 kmph. It was owned by the G Thompson & Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 2 June 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A15 Star of England

HMAT A15 Star of England at Pinkenbar, Queensland, September 1914

[From: AWM C02483]

The HMAT A15 Star of England, later renamed Port Sydney, weighed 9,136 tons with an average cruise speed of 13.5 knots or 25.00 kmph. It was owned by the Commonwealth & Dominion Line Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 22 September 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A16 Star of Victoria

HMAT A16 Star of Victoria

[From: AWM P00369.007]

The HMAT A16 Star of Victoria, later renamed Port Melbourne, weighed 9,152 tons with an average cruise speed of 13.5 knots or 25.00 kmph. It was owned by the Commonwealth & Dominion Line Ltd London and leased by the Commonwealth until 2 October 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A17 Port Lincoln

HMAT A17 Port Lincoln
 
The HMAT A17 Port Lincoln weighed 7,243 tons with an average cruise speed of 12 knots or 22.22 kmph. It was owned by the Commonwealth & Dominion Line Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 26 September 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A18 Wiltshire

HMAT A18 Wiltshire

The HMAT A18 Wiltshire weighed 10,390 tons with an average cruise speed of 13.5 knots or 25.00 kmph. It was owned by the Commonwealth & Dominion Line Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 2 October 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A19 Afric

HMAT A19 Afric

The HMAT A19 Afric weighed 11,999 tons with an average cruise speed of 13 knots or 24.07 kmph. It was owned by the Federal SN Co Ltd, London. The Afric was torpedoed and sunk in the English Chanel, 12 February 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A20 Hororata

HMAT A20 Hororata, Port Melbourn, 23 November 1916

The HMAT A20 Hororata weighed 9,400 tons with an average cruise speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. It was owned by the New Zealand Shipping Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 11 September 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A21 Marere

HMAT A21 Marere

[From: State Library of NSW, picture number a638400]  

The HMAT A21 Marere weighed 6443 tons with an average cruise speed of 12.5 knots or 23.15 kmph. It was owned by the Commonwealth & Dominion Line Ltd, London. The Marere was sunk by a submarine's gunfire in the Mediterranean, 18 January 1916.

 

 

 

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HMAT A22 Rangatira

HMAT A22 Rangatira about to leave Pinkenba Wharf Brisbane, Qld, 24 September 1914

The HMAT A22 Rangatira weighed 8948 tons with an average cruise speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. It was owned by the Shaw, Savill and Albion Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 15 February 1915. The Rangatira was stranded off Cape of Good Hope, 31 March 1916.

 

 

 

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HMAT A23 Suffolk

HMAT A23 Suffolk sailing through the Suez Canal, 1916

The HMAT A23 Suffolk weighed 7573 tons with an average cruise speed of 12 knots or 22.22 kmph. It was owned by the Potter, Trinder and Gwyn, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 14 June 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A24 Benalla

HMAT A24 Benalla at Port Melbourne, 19 October 1914

The HMAT A24 Benalla weighed 11,118 tons with an average cruise speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. It was owned by the P & O SN Co, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 6 August 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A25 Anglo-Egyptian

 

HMAT A25 Anglo-Egyptian at Port Melbourne, 1916

[From: AWM PB0112]

The HMAT A25 Anglo-Egyptian weighed 7,379 tons with an average cruise speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. It was owned by the Nitrate Producers SS Co, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 16 April 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A26 Armadale

HMAT A26 Armadale, at Port Melbourne, February 1915
 
 [From: AWM P05194.001]

The HMAT A26 Armadale weighed 6,153 tons with an average cruise speed of 11 knots or 20.37 kmph. It was owned by the Australind SS Co, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 7 June 1917. The Armadale was torpedoed and sunk by a submarine off coast of Ireland, 27 June 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A27 Southern

HMAT A27 Southern, part of the 1st Convoy, 1914

[From: AWM H15740]

The HMAT A27 Southern weighed 4,769 tons with an average cruise speed of 10.5 knots or 19.44 kmph. It was owned by the Central Shipping Co, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 3 February 1915.

 

 

 

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HMAT A28 Miltiades

HMAT A28 Miltiades in King George's Sound, Albany, October 1914

The HMAT A28 Miltiades weighed 7,814 tons with an average cruise speed of 13 knots or 24.07 kmph. It was owned by the G Thompson & Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 15 September 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A29 Suevic

HMAT A29 Suevic, 1919

The HMAT A29 Suevic weighed 12,531 tons with an average cruise speed of 13 knots or 24.07 kmph. It was owned by the Oceanic SN Co Ltd, Liverpool, and leased by the Commonwealth until 9 September 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A30 Borda

HMAT A30 Borda
 
[From: State Library of Victoria a17530]
The HMAT A30 Borda weighed 11,136 tons with an average cruise speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. It was owned by the P & O SN Co, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 10 September 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A31 Ajana

HMAT A31 Ajana

 

The HMAT A31 Ajana weighed 7,759 tons with an average cruise speed of 13 knots or 24.07 kmph. It was owned by the Australind SS Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 12 May 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A32 Themistocles

HMAT A32 Themistocles

The HMAT A32 Themistocles weighed 11,231 tons with an average cruise speed of 15 knots or 27.78 kmph. It was owned by the G Thompson & Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 20 October 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A33 Ayrshire

 

 HMAT A33 Ayrshire departing from Port Melbourne on 3 July 1916 

The HMAT A33 Ayrshire weighed 7,763 tons with an average cruise speed of 13 knots or 24.07 kmph. It was owned by the The Scottish Shire Line Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 9 January 1918.

 

 

 

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HMAT A34 Persic

HMAT A34 Persic departing from Port Melbourne on 3 June 1916
 
 [From: AWM P00997.013]

The HMAT A34 Persic weighed 12,042 tons with an average cruise speed of 13 knots or 24.07 kmph. It was owned by the Oceanic SN Co Ltd, Liverpool, and leased by the Commonwealth until 8 November 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A35 Berrima

HMAT A35 Berrima

[From: Clydesite 11748]

The HMAT A35 Berrima weighed 11,137 tons with an average cruise speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. It was owned by the P & O SN Co, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 10 October 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A36 Boonah

HMAT A36 Boonah

[From: State Library of NSW, PXE 722/526-527]

The HMAT A36 Boonah weighed 5,926 tons with an average cruise speed of 10.5 knots or 19.44 kmph. The Boonah was previously a captured German vessel called Melbourne. It was manned by Australia officers and crew and transferred to Commonwealth Government Line, 28 March 1918.

 

 

 

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HMAT A37 Barambah

HMAT A37 Barambah at Port Melbourne on 5 June 1916

The HMAT A37 Barambah weighed 5,923 tons with an average cruise speed of 10.5 knots or 19.44 kmph. The Barambah was previously a captured German vessel called Hobart. It was manned by Australia officers and crew and transferred to Commonwealth Government Line, 23 May 1918.

 

 

 

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HMAT A38 Ulysses

HMAT A38 Ulysses at Port Said, December 1914
 
The HMAT A38 Ulysses weighed 14,499 tons with an average cruise speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. It was owned by the China Mutual SN Co, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 15 August 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A39 Port MacQuarie

HMAT A39 Port MacQuarie

The HMAT A39 Port MacQuarie weighed 7,236 tons with an average cruise speed of 12.5 knots or 23.15 kmph. It was owned by the Commonwealth & Dominion Line Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 13 January 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A40 Ceramic

HMAT A40 Ceramic, Port Melbourne, 1915

The HMAT A40 Ceramic weighed 18,481 tons with an average cruise speed of 15 knots or 27.78 kmph. It was owned by the Oceanic SN Co Ltd, Liverpool, and leased by the Commonwealth until 9 July 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A41 Bakara

HMAT A41 Bakara

[From: State Library of Victoria, picture number gr001322]  

The HMAT A41 Bakara weighed 5,930 tons with an average cruise speed of 10.5 knots or 19.44 kmph. The Bakara was previously a captured German vessel called Constaff. It was manned by Australia officers and crew and transferred to Commonwealth Government Line, 1 May 1918.

 

 

 

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HMAT A42 Boorara

HMAT A42 Boorara at Port Melbourne on 10 May 1917

The HMAT A42 Boorara weighed 5,923 tons with an average cruise speed of 10.5 knots or 19.44 kmph. The Boorara was previously a captured German vessel called Pfalz. It was manned by Australia officers and crew and transferred to Commonwealth Government Line, 24 June 1919.

 

 

 

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HMAT A43 Barunga

HMAT A43 Barunga

[From: State Library of NSW, picture number a636443

The HMAT A43 Barunga weighed 7,484 tons with an average cruise speed of 11 knots or 20.37 kmph. The Barunga was previously a captured German vessel called Sumatra. It was manned by Australia officers and crew. The Barunga was torpedoed and sunk by a submarine in the North Atlantic, 15 July 1918.

 

 

 

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HMAT A44 Vestalia

HMAT A44 Vestalia at Port Melbourne on 6 December 1916
 
[From: AWM PB0776]

The HMAT A44 Vestalia weighed 5,528 tons with an average cruise speed of 15 knots or 27.78 kmph. It was owned by the Gow, Harrison & Co, Glasgow, and leased by the Commonwealth until 10 March 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A45 Bulla

HMAT A45 Bulla

[From: State Library of Victoria, picture number gr006216

The HMAT A45 Bulla weighed 5,099 tons with an average cruise speed of 10.5 knots or 19.44 kmph. The Bulla was previously a captured German vessel called Hessen. It was manned by Australian officers and crew and transferred to Commonwealth Government Line, 15 April 1918.

 

 

 

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HMAT A46 Clan McGillivray

HMAT A46 Clan McGillivray

[From: State Library of Victoria, picture number gr006195]

The HMAT A46 Clan McGillivray weighed 5,023 tons with an average cruise speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. It was owned by the Cayser, Irvin and Co, Glasgow, and leased by the Commonwealth until 16 August 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A47 Mashobra

 HMAT A47 Mashobra

The HMAT A47 Mashobra weighed 8,174 tons with an average cruise speed of 12.5 knots or 23.15 kmph. It was owned by the British India SN Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 21 December 1916. The Mashobra was torpedoed and sunk in the Mediterranean, 15 April 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A48 Seang Bee

HMAT A48 Seang Bee

The HMAT A48 Seang Bee weighed 5,849 tons with an average cruise speed of 13 knots or 24.07 kmph. It was owned by the Lim Chin Tsong, Rangoon, and leased by the Commonwealth until 12 May 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A49 Seang Choon

HMAT A49 Seang Choon

[From: State Library of NSW, picture number a639566]

The HMAT A49 Seang Choon weighed 5,807 tons with an average cruise speed of 12 knots or 22.22 kmph. It was owned by the Lim Chin Tsong, Rangoon. The Seang Choon was torpedoed and sunk off coast of Ireland, 10 July 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A50 Itonus

HMAT A50 Itonus

[From: State Library of Victoria, picture number b38118]

The HMAT A50 Itonus weighed 5,340 tons with an average cruise speed of 12 knots or 22.22 kmph. It was owned by the British India SN Co Ltd, London. The Itonus was torpedoed and sunk in the Mediterranean, 20 December 1916.

 

 

 

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HMAT A51 Chilka

HMAT A51 Chilka

The HMAT A51 Chilka weighed 3,952 tons with an average cruise speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. It was owned by the British India SN Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 4 August 1915.

 

 

 

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HMAT A52 Surada

HMAT A52 Surada

The HMAT A52 Surada weighed 5,324 tons with an average cruise speed of 10 knots or 18.52 kmph. It was owned by the British India SN Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 4 January 1917. The Surada was torpedoed and sunk by a submarine in Mediterranean, 2 November 1918.

 

 

 

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HMAT A53 Itria

HMAT A53 Itria

The HMAT A53 Itria weighed 5,318 tons with an average cruise speed of 10 knots or 18.52 kmph. It was owned by the British India SN Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 17 June 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A54 Runic

HMAT A54 Runic

[From: State Library of NSW, PXE 722/3502-3506]

The HMAT A54 Runic weighed 12,490 tons with an average cruise speed of 13 knots or 24.07 kmph. It was owned by the Oceanic SN Co Ltd, Liverpool, and leased by the Commonwealth until 27 November 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A55 Kyarra

HMAT A55 Kyarra, 1916

The HMAT A55 Kyarra weighed 6,953 tons with an average cruise speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. It was owned by the AUSN Co Ltd, London, and manned by Australia officers and crew. The Kyarra was leased by the Commonwealth until 4 January 1918. The Kyarra was torpedoed and sunk by a submarine in the English Channel, 26 May 1918.

 

 

 

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HMAT A56 Palermo

HMAT A56 Palermo

[From: State Library of NSW, picture number a639050]  

The HMAT A56 Palermo weighed 7,597 tons with an average cruise speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. It was owned by the P & O SN Co, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 10 January 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A57 Malakuta

HMAT A57 Malakuta

[From: Clydebuilt Ships Database]  

The HMAT A57 Malakuta weighed 7,430 tons with an average cruise speed of 12 knots or 22.22 kmph. It was owned by the T & J Brocklebank Ltd, Liverpool, and leased by the Commonwealth until 24 January 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A58 Kabinga

HMAT A58 Kabinga

[From: State Library of Victoria, picture number pc000664]

The HMAT A58 Kabinga weighed 4,657 tons with an average cruise speed of 12 knots or 22.22 kmph. It was owned by the Ellerman & Bucknall SS Co Ltd, London. The Kabinga was captured by Emden in the Bay of Bengal on 12 September 1914 and released with the Emden’s beaching at the Cocos Islands. The Kabinga was leased by the Commonwealth until 19 June 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A59 Botanist

HMAT A59 Botanist



The HMAT A59 Botanist weighed 7,688 tons with an average cruise speed of 13 knots or 24.07 kmph. It was owned by the Charente SS Co Ltd, Liverpool, and leased by the Commonwealth until 6 December 1916.

 

 

 

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HMAT A60 Aeneas

HMAT A60 Aeneas embarking from Port Melbourne on 30 October 1917

The HMAT A60 Aeneas weighed 10,049 tons with an average cruise speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. It was owned by the Ocean SS Co Ltd, Liverpool, and leased by the Commonwealth until 22 June 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A61 Kanowna

HMAT A61 Kanowna embarking from Townsville Harbour, August 1914

[From: The Queenslander, 22 August 1914, p. 30.]

The HMAT A61 Kanowna weighed 6,942 tons with an average cruise speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. It was owned by the AUSN Co Ltd, London, and manned by Australia officers and crew. The Kanowna was leased by the Commonwealth until 18 March 1919.

 

 

 

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HMAT A62 Wandilla

HMAT A62 Wandilla

The HMAT A62 Wandilla weighed 7,785 tons with an average cruise speed of 16 knots or 29.63 kmph. It was owned by the Adelaide SS Co Ltd, Adelaide, and manned by Australian officers and during her service by mainly Australian crews. The Wandilla was leased by the Commonwealth until 24 January 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A63 Karoola

HMAT A63 Karoola

[From: State Library of Victoria, picture number gr005940]

The HMAT A63 Karoola weighed 7,391 tons with an average cruise speed of 15 knots or 27.78 kmph. It was owned by the McIlwraith, McEacharn's Line Pty Ltd, Melbourne, and manned by Australian officers and crews. The Karoola was leased by the Commonwealth until June 1919.

 

 

 

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HMAT A64 Demosthenes

HMAT A64 Demosthenes

The HMAT A64 Demosthenes weighed 11,223 tons with an average cruise speed of 15 knots or 27.78 kmph. It was owned by the G Thompson & Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 16 March 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A65 Clan Macewen

The HMAT A65 Clan Macewen weighed 5,140 tons with an average cruise speed of 15 knots or 27.78 kmph. It was owned by the Cayser, Irvin and Co, Glasgow, and leased by the Commonwealth until 14 April 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A66 Uganda

The HMAT A66 Uganda weighed 5,431 tons with an average cruise speed of 10 knots or 18.52 kmph. It was owned by the British India SN Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 4 December 1916. The Uganda was torpedoed and sunk by a submarine in Mediterranean, 27 May 1918.

 

 

 

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HMAT A67 Orsova

HMAT A67 Orsova embarking from Port Melbourne on 17 July 1915

The HMAT A67 Orsova weighed 12,036 tons with an average cruise speed of 18 knots or 33.33 kmph. It was owned by the Orient SN Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 28 February 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A68 Anchises

HMAT A68 Anchises at Port Melbourne on 14 March 1916

The HMAT A68 Anchises weighed 10,046 tons with an average cruise speed of 10 knots or 18.52 kmph. It was owned by the Ocean SS Co Ltd, Liverpool, and leased by the Commonwealth until 12 October 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A69 Warilda

HMAT A69 Warilda

The HMAT A69 Warilda weighed 7,713 tons with an average cruise speed of 16 knots or 29.63 kmph. It was owned by the Adelaide SS Co Ltd, Adelaide, and manned by Australian officers and mainly by Australian crews. The Warilda was torpedoed and sunk by a submarine in the English Channel, 3 August 1918.

 

 

 

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HMAT A70 Ballarat

HMAT A70 Ballarat

[From: State Library of Victoria, picture number gr005940

The HMAT A70 Ballarat weighed 11,120 tons with an average cruise speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. It was owned by the P & O SN Co, London. The Ballarat was torpedoed by a submarine in the English Channel, 25 April 1917 and sank the next day.

 

 

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HMAT A71 Nestor

HMAT A71 Nestor

The HMAT A71 Nestor weighed 14,501 tons with an average cruise speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. It was owned by the Ocean SS Co Ltd, Liverpool, and leased by the Commonwealth until 26 June 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A72 Beltana

HMAT A72 Beltana at Pinkenba wharf Brisbane, Queensland. c. 1917

[From: AWM H02219]

The HMAT A72 Beltana weighed 11,120 tons with an average cruise speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. It was owned by the P & O SN Co, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 14 September 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A73 Commonwealth

HMAT A73 Commonwealth

[From: Clydebuilt Ships Database

The HMAT A73 Commonwealth weighed 6,616 tons with an average cruise speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. It was owned by the P & O SN Co, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 23 June 1917.

 

 

 

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HMAT A74 Marathon

HMAT A74 Marathon

[From: Clydebuilt Ships Database]  

The HMAT A74 Marathon weighed 7,827 tons with an average cruise speed of 16 knots or 29.63 kmph. It was owned by the G Thompson & Co Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 28 July 1917.



Royal Mail Steamers

These Royal Mail Steamers were contracted to carry the mail between Australia and Britain. On occasion, parts of the ship were booked by the AIF to carry troops and cargo. The following list is of the Royal Mail Steamers who carried troops:

 

 

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RMS Kashgar

RMS Kashgar

[From: Clydebuilt Ships Database]

The RMS Kashgar weighed 8,840 tons with an average cruise speed of 15 knots or 27.78 kmph. It was owned by the P & O SN Co, London.

 

 

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RMS Karmala

RMS Karmala

The RMS Karmala weighed 8,9479 with an average cruise speed of 15 knots or 27.78 kmph. It was owned by the P & O SN Co, London.

 

 

 

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RMS Megantic

RMS Megantic

The RMS Megantic weighed 5,531 tons with an average cruise speed of 15 knots or 27.78 kmph. It was owned by F.Leyland & Co., Liverpool. It was torpedoed and sunk on 10 June 1917.

 

 

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RMS Malwa

RMS Malwa
 
[From: Clydebuilt Ships Database

The RMS Malwa weighed 10,883 tons with an average cruise speed of 15 knots or 27.78 kmph. It was owned by the P & O SN Co, London.

 

 

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RMS Moldavia

RMS Moldavia
 
[From: Clydebuilt Ships Database

The RMS Moldavia weighed 9,500 tons with an average cruise speed of 18.5 knots or 34.26 kmph. It was owned by the P & O SN Co, London.

 

 

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RMS Mongolia

RMS Mongolia

[From: Clydebuilt Ships Database

The RMS Mongolia weighed 4,892 tons with an average cruise speed of 12 knots or 22.22 kmph. It was owned by the  Indian & Peninsular St. Nav Co Ltd Glasgow.  Torpedoed and sunk on 21 July 1918.

 

 

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RMS Mooltan

RMS Mooltan

[From: Clydebuilt Ships Database

The RMS Mooltan weighed 9,621 tons with an average cruise speed of 18.5 knots or 34.26 kmph. It was owned by the P & O SN Co, London.  Torpedoed and sunk by UC27 on 26 July 1917.

 

 

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RMS Morea

RMS Morea

[From: Clydebuilt Ships Database

The RMS Morea weighed 10,890 tons with an average cruise speed of 16 knots or 29.63 kmph. It was owned by the P & O SN Co, London.  

 

 

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RMS Orontes

RMS Orontes

 [From: AWM 303744]

The RMS Orontes weighed 9,028 tons with an average cruise speed of 18 knots or 33.33 kmph. It was owned by the P & O SN Co, London.

 

 

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RMS Osterley

RMS Osterley

[From: Clydebuilt Ships Database

The RMS Osterley weighed 12,129 tons with an average cruise speed of 18 knots or 33.33 kmph. It was owned by the P & O SN Co, London.

 

 

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RMS Persia

RMS Persia

[From: Clydebuilt Ships Database

The RMS Persia weighed 7,974 tons with an average cruise speed of 18 knots or 33.33 kmph. It was owned by the P & O SN Co, London. Torpedoed and sunk on 30 December 1915.


 
Steam Ships

Occasionally, single voyage charters occurred between the ship companies and the AIF to be employed as troop transports. The following list is of the Steam Ships who carried troops:

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SS Balmoral Castle

 

SS Balmoral Castle

[From: Clydebuilt Ships Database]  

The SS Balmoral Castle weighed 13,361 tons with an average cruise speed of 16.5 knots or 30.55 kmph. It was owned by the Union-Castle Mail Steamship Company. 

 

 

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SS Canberra

SS Canberra

[From: Clydebuilt Ships Database]   

The SS Canberra weighed 7,707 tons with an average cruise speed of 16.5 knots or 30.55 kmph. It was owned by the Australian Steamships Ltd (Howard Smith), Melbourne.  

 

 

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SS Carpentaria

SS Carpentaria

[From: State Library of Victoria, picture number gr004969]  

The SS Carpentaria weighed 5,766 tons with an average cruise speed of 16.5 knots or 30.55 kmph. It was owned by British India Steam Navigation Co. Ltd., Calcutta.  

 

 

 

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SS City of Karachi

SS City of Karachi

The SS City of Karachi weighed 5,766 tons with an average cruise speed of 16.5 knots or 30.55 kmph. It was owned by Ellerman & Bucknall Steamship Co., London.  

 

 

 

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SS Dorset

SS Dorset

The SS Dorset weighed 7,630 tons with an average cruise speed of 16.5 knots or 30.55 kmph. It was a purpose built refrigeration ship owned by Potter, Trinder & Gwyn, London.  

 

 

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SS Dunluce Castle

SS Dunluce Castle

 

 

 

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SS Ellenga

SS Ellenga at El Mina Wharf, Tripoli, Lebanon, 1919

[From: AWM P01122.003]

The SS Ellenga weighed 5,196 tons with an average cruise speed of 16 knots or 29.63 kmph. It was owned by the British India Steam Navigation Company Glasgow & London.

 

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SS Essex

SS Essex

[From: State Library of Victoria, picture number gr003102

 

 

 

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SS Field Marshal

 

 

 

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SS Gaika

SS Gaika

[From: State Library of Victoria, picture number gr003122]  

 

 

 

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SS Graechus

 

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SS Hawkes Bay

SS Hawkes Bay

 

 

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SS Kaiser-i-Hind

SS Kaiser-i-Hind

[From: State Library of Victoria, picture number gr001405]

The SS Kaiser-i-Hind weighed 11,430 tons with an average cruise speed of 18 knots or 33.33 kmph. It was owned by the P & O SN Co, London. 

 

 

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SS Indarra

 

SS Indarra

[From: Clydebuilt Ships Database]   

The SS Indarra weighed 9,735 tons with an average cruise speed of 16.5 knots or 30.55 kmph. It was owned by the Australasian United Steam Nav Co., Fremantle.  

 

 

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SS Katoomba

SS Katoomba

[From: State Library of Victoria, picture number gr007142

 

 

 

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SS Mahanada

 

SS Mahanada

[From: Clydebuilt Ships Database]    

The SS Mahanada weighed 7,196 tons with an average cruise speed of 12 knots or 22.22 kmph. It was owned by Thos & Jno Brocklebank Ltd., Liverpool.   

 

 

 

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SS Makarini

 

SS Makarini

[From: State Library of NSW, picture number a638277]  

The SS Makarini weighed 10,624 tons with an average cruise speed of 13 knots or 24.07 kmph. It was owned by G.D.Tyser & Co, London. Accommodation for 750-steerage class passengers. Built by Workman, Clark & Co, Belfast, she was launched on 3rd Feb.1912. In 1914 Tyser's was taken over by the Commonwealth & Dominion Line (Port Line) and she was renamed SS Port Nicholson. Mined and sunk 15 miles West of Dunkirk 15 January1917. [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.1, ISBN 0-85059-174-0, which contains a photo of the ship] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.21, Port Line]

 

 

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SS Malta

The SS Malta weighed 6,064 tons with an average cruise speed of 18 knots or 33.33 kmph. It was owned by the P & O SN Co, London. 

 

 

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SS Ormonde

SS Ormonde

[From: Clydebuilt Ships Database

The SS Ormonde weighed 14,982 tons with an average cruise speed of 18 knots or 33.33 kmph. It was owned by the Orient St Nav Co Ltd, Glasgow. 

 

 

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SS Pakeha

SS Pakeha

[From: State Library of Victoria, picture number bs004061

The SS Pakeha weighed 4,331 tons with an average cruise speed of 18 knots or 33.33 kmph. It was owned by the Shaw, Savill and Albion Company, London. 

 

 

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SS Port Darwin

SS Port Darwin

[From: State Library of Victoria, picture number gr006378

 

 

 

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SS Port Denison

 

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SS Port Lyttelton

SS Port Lyttelton

The SS Port Lyttelton [sometimes referred to as SS Port Lydelton in Australian sources] was formerly the SS Niwaru but requisitioned in 1916 as a troop ship and renamed to SS Port Lyttelton. The ship weighed 6,444 tons with an average cruise speed of 12 knots or 22.22 kmph. It was owned by the Commonwealth & Dominion Line, London. 

 

 

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SS Port Napier

SS Port Napier

[From: State Library of NSW, picture number a639252 ]   


 

 

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SS Ruahine II

SS Ruahine II

[From: NZSCo Assn.]

The SS Ruahine II [sometimes referred to as SS Rushine in Australian sources] weighed 10,832 tons with an average cruise speed of 18 knots or 33.33 kmph. It was owned by the NZ Shipping Coy, Auckland. 

 

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SS Wyreema

 

SS Wyreema

[From: Clydebuilt Ships Database

The SS Wyreema weighed 6,926 tons with an average cruise speed of 18 knots or 33.33 kmph. It was owned by the Australasian United Steam Navigation Co, Melbourne. 

 

 

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SS Zealandic

SS Zealandic

[From: State Library of Victoria, picture number bs004070

The SS Zealandic weighed 8,090 tons with an average cruise speed of 18 knots or 33.33 kmph. It was owned by the White Star Line, London. 

 


Citation: Troop transport ships


Posted by Project Leader at 12:01 AM EAST
Updated: Wednesday, 18 May 2011 11:11 PM EADT
AMR, NZMRB account about Romani
Topic: AIF - NZMRB - AMR

Auckland Mounted Rifles

Battle of Romani, Sinai, August 4 to 5, 1916

 

Auckland Mounted Rifles account about the Battle of Romani

 

Romani, Mount Royston in background - Painting by George Lambert

[From: AWM ART02704]

 

For a contour map of the area drawn by Lambert, see:

1:40,000 map of Mt Royston area

 

13/112 Sergeant Charles Gordon Nicol, a member of the Auckland Mounted Rifles, a unit which was part of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade, wrote an account of this unit called The Story of Two Campains”  Official war history of the Auckland Mounted Rifles Regiment, 1914 - 1919 in the Battlefields  of Gallipoli, Sinai and Palestine during WWI, in which included a section specifically related to the battle of Beersheba and is extracted below. A copy of this book is available on the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Association website.

Nicol, CG, The story of two campaigns : official war history of the Auckland Mounted Rifles Regiment, 1914-1919, (Auckland 1921).

 

CHAPTER XVII.

Romani Opens.


Notwithstanding the fact that it was the height of summer, the Turk was about to challenge. His first concentrations, a few miles east of Katia, were observed on July 19 by General Chaytor and an airman who had taken him out for a “joy ride” after the desert had been reported clear. The force was estimated at 9,000 men with guns. The bringing of heavy guns over the desert for so many miles was a remarkable feat. It was afterwards found that in many places the Turks had made a gun road by digging ditches where the wheels were to run, and filling them with brush, which prevented the wheels sinking in the soft sand.

The Turks started to dig in on a line from Oghratina to Mageibra. All the vital eminences were held in strength, and our patrols were frequently fired on, in some cases by machine-guns. Patrols of the A.M.R., under Lieutenants Reed and Martin, were sent to Bir Nagid, some 15 to 20 miles to the south, to keep a secret watch against the enemy’s left. Secrecy demanded that this little post, so far from assistance, must be supplied with rations and water and fodder during the hours of darkness. Camels, of course, had to be used to transport the supplies, and as they took four or five hours to cover the outward journey, this was a matter of some difficulty. The fact that the camel drivers were Mohammedan Indians, under a superb looking individual who wore a sword, and that the escort was a party of A.M.R. troopers under a corporal, led to an amusing incident the first night, or rather morning. Dawn was just about to break when the loads had been taken off, and there was need for haste if the camels were to be out of sight by sunrise. The Indians did not appreciate the position, and instead of turning back at once, they washed their hands and made ready to pray as the sun came up, the individual with the sword not excepted. The A.M.R. corporal tried persuasion, but that being of no avail, he used the toe of his boot on the head Indian. This form of persuasion was quite effectual.

At the time the enemy’s intentions were not known. He was certainly expected to move forward and gain the advantages of the Katia system of oases, but there seemed every possibility that there he would wait for the British to dislodge him. The Commander-in-Chief decided to give him battle on August 13. A considerable force of infantry was in position, but the chief activity for some days was among the mounted troops of both sides. The enemy did not wait to be attacked, however. On July 27 his force, estimated now to number about 20,000 men, made an advance to Abu Darem, in the south, but was checked to some extent in the north by Light Horse and the W.M.R., with whom the latter were then brigaded.

So far the A.M.R. had remained at Hill 70 “standing by.” Important patrol duties were daily carried out. On August 1, part of the 11th squadron was sent to establish a strong post to Bir En Nuss, some miles to the east of Dudar, to sink sufficient wells to water a brigade, and part was sent to Bir Nagid to keep a watch on, the Turks. These hods were opposite the Turkish left, which was “in the blue,” the desert being its only protection, and the troopers looked forward with the liveliest anticipation to what they hoped would be a rapid out—flanking movement, the eternal dream of cavalry. The troops of Finlayson and Alsopp were in touch with enemy patrols, and were able to send in valuable information as to the activities of the enemy at Hamisah. On August 3 the remaining two squadrons relieved some Light Horse at Dueidar. That night the enemy force made a general advance, one of the fiercest fights being a delaying action by a small body of Light Horse at Hod “El Enna”. On the morning of the 4th, the Turks commenced to push forward their left flank, in a north-west direction, towards the high ground west of Bir Etmaler, and soon were on Mount Royston, a high sand dune, three miles north of Romani. This hill now became the key to the whole action. Whatever side held it would have possession of Romani, and it fell to the New Zealanders to take a prominent part in the action which regained the hill and put the seal of failure upon the hopes of the German led Turks.

At 7 a.m. the New Zealand Brigade, in which the 5th Light Horse had taken the place of the W.M.R. who had been detached for some time, got orders to move forward. The A.M.R. was at Dueidar, and got orders to join the brigade as strong as possible. The 3rd squadron and two troops of the 4th squadron rejoined the column a mile and a-half south- east of Canterbury Hill, the 11th squadron and the balance of the 4th squadron remaining to patrol the Dueidar-Katia road. About 11.30 a.m. a force of Turks, numbering 2,000, was observed on Mount Royston. About midday, after being heavily shelled by the skilful German or Austrian gunners on the ridge, a dismounted advance was ordered, the C.M.R. being on the left, the 3rd squadron of the A.M.R. in the centre, and yeomanry on the right. It was actually an enveloping movement, the New Zealanders moving against the Turkish front and the yeomanry against their southern flank. Enemy advanced posts were driven back, and the 3rd squadron, now supported by Major McCarroll with the two troops and the machine-gun section, again moved forward across the sandy “waves.” The warm fire of the Turks was returned vigor- ously by the A.M.R. machine-guns and the supporting battery, which had brought up its guns with twelve horse teams. Steadily the line moved forward, but surprisingly few casualties were suffered, one of the reasons being the advantage taken by the men of the cover offered by slight depressions, while the dangerous ruts, running parallel with the advance, were avoided. It was to be a race against time. If the hill did not fall before nightfall all the effort of the day would be lost, so a general advance was ordered for 4.45 p.m. When the moment arrived, the Turks had begun to feel the pressure of the enfilade fire from the south, and they had already evacuated a position slightly in advance of the base of the hill, and also the left end of their trenches on the ridge itself.

As soon as the final rush began the attackers were met by white flags instead of bullets. About 250 Turks were taken by the A.M.R., including a complete hospital. With the south section of the position taken, it was merely a matter of

moments before the whole position was occupied, over 1,000 prisoners being secured besides a battery of mountain guns. The first man to reach the guns was  Lieutenant 0. Johnson, of the A.M.R., who was killed a few days later. In the latter stages of the action some infantry gave support on the left.

Altogether it was a very satisfactory day’s work, and the results were of the highest importance, seeing that the Turkish retirement began almost immediately. The Regiment had carried itself according to its Gallipoli traditions, and they were very tired but very satisfied men who rode back that night to rest after handing over the position to the infantry. But perhaps the proudest man of all was the padre, who had the distinction of getting a piece of metal through his hat without receiving any injury.

 

Additional Reading:

Battle of Romani, Sinai, August 4 to 5, 1916, Contents

Bir el Abd, Sinai, August 9, 1916

 


Citation: AMR, NZMRB account about Romani

Posted by Project Leader at 12:01 AM EAST
Updated: Tuesday, 7 April 2009 4:51 PM EADT
WMR, NZMRB account about Romani
Topic: AIF - NZMRB - WMR

Wellington Mounted Rifles

Battle of Romani, Sinai, August 4 to 5, 1916

 

Wellington Mounted Rifles account about the Battle of Romani

 


Romani - Painting by Thomas Henry Ivers

[From: AWM ART02598]

 

Major Alexander Herbert Wilkie, Adjutant of the Wellington Mounted Rifles, a unit which was part of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade, wrote an account of this unit in 1924 called Official War History of the Wellington Mounted Rifles Regiment - 1914 - 1919, in which included a section specifically related to the battle of Beersheba and is extracted below. A copy of this book is available on the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Association website.

 

Wilkie, AH, Official War History of the Wellington Mounted Rifles Regiment - 1914 - 1919, (Auckland 1924).


Battle of Romani Operations

At this time our defensive line extended from the vicinity of Mehamdiyeh, an ancient watering-place, on the left, and then continued southward for a distance of six miles along a line of sand dunes to Katib Gannet, a razor-backed sandhill a mile and a-half south-east of Bir Et Maler. This line was entrenched and held by the 52nd (Lowland) Scottish Division, and it covered the railhead then at Romani, the remainder of the railway being protected by the 1st and 2nd Brigades near Romani and Bir Et Maler and by the New Zealand and 5th Yeomanry Brigades at Hill 70. The two latter brigades guarded also the water-pipe and telegraph lines from Kantara

Lieut.-General H. A. Lawrence commanded the troops in the forward zone, his infantry reserves being some distance in the rear. The headquarters of the Commander-in-Chief, Sir Archibald Murray, were then at Cairo, 130 miles from Romani

On 22nd July the W.M.R. encountered the enemy near Sagia, and the 2nd Squadron captured seven prisoners. The Turks were gradually pressing forward, making no attempt to conceal themselves, their idea apparently being to make as much display as possible in order to impress on our troops his great strength. During the next few days the 1st and 2nd Brigades were kept busy checking the enemy, and on the 28th the 2nd W.M.R. Squadron encountered strong opposition at Umm Ugba, two miles north of Katia. The Turks had taken the Hod there, and were within striking distance of the wells at Katia, so Colonel Meldrum, who commanded our left flank facing Umm Ugba, asked permission from General Royston to take the Hod and to have two guns to assist in the attack. General Royston, who loved a fight, consented, and the attack was made by two W.M.R. Squadrons under cover of machine-gun and artillery fire, and carried out at the point of the bayonet with great determination. The enemy were driven out of the Hod, leaving sixteen dead and eight unwounded prisoners on our hands. The Lewis gunners, under Lieutenant Herrick, performed particularly good work. Finally the Ayrshire Battery shelled an enemy camp at Sagia, on our right, and scattered it

Meanwhile the Turks had been advancing their left flank towards Bir Nagid, where posts of the New Zealand Brigade were located

The country on our right flank, towards Katia, was quite open, and through it ran the ancient road connecting Katia with Duiedar. The possibility of the Turkish attack developing in that direction had been considered by General Lawrence in consultation with Divisional Commanders, and the question as to whether the high ground known as "Wellington Ridge," eight hundred yards south of the W.M.R. camp, should be held and defended was discussed. General Chauvel favoured this being done, and his representations were well grounded, as will be seen later. Wellington Ridge commanded the Light Horse Camps, but it was considered to be too isolated for an Infantry post to hold, so the idea of holding and defending it was abandoned

Early on the morning of August 3rd the 2nd Brigade relieved the 1st Brigade, observing the enemy at Katia. The W.M.R. was advance guard that day, and they soon came under heavy fire. The Turks were in strength, and there was great activity along their positions, so the 2nd Brigade took up an outpost line to keep them under observation, till nightfall, when the Brigade commenced to return to Et Maler, leaving officers' patrols to watch the enemy

At this time the enemy line ran generally as follows :- From a point on his right six miles east of Romani, through the Katia Oasis, and thence to Bir Nagid, his left - a total of seven miles

Meanwhile two regiments of the 1st Brigade had taken up an outpost line three miles in length from Wellington Ridge southward on the right of the Infantry line through Mount Meredith to Hod El Enna to cover the entrants to the gullies which opened towards Katia from the Romani camps. In view of subsequent events, this disposition proved to be a wise one, the presence of these posts confusing the enemy when he appeared and delaying his advance for some time

When the 2nd Brigade withdrew from Katia the Turks must have followed close on its heels, for at 11.30 p.m. the 1st Brigade reported that an enemy force was moving along its front, and just before midnight firing began, principally at Mount Meredith and Hod El Enna. The enemy was found to be in great strength in both these places, and the 2nd Light Horse Brigade, which had reached camp; was ordered out

This brigade did not immediately take part in the fight, being placed under cover of Wellington Ridge, but eventually its firmness and tenacity assisted in checking and finally defeating the Turkish advance

Soon after the Turks had commenced to attack Mount Meredith, firing ceased for some time. This was mystifying at first, but it later transpired that the lull was due to the Turks having wrongly estimated the position of the line held by our troops, as captured enemy maps showed our line much further back. The Light Horse posts around Mount Meredith had not been anticipated by the Turkish Commander, and when our true position became known he had to remodel his plans

At 2.15 on the morning of the 4th, however, heavy firing broke out all along the line, the Turks apparently being ordered to attack whatever was in front of them

The troops at Hod El Enna and Mount Meredith were sorely pressed, and began to withdraw gradually. The enemy pressed the attack with great vigour, and events around Mount Meredith began to develop rapidly. Strong bodies of the enemy were outflanking our right, gaining ground slowly, and at 4 a.m. the 1st Brigade was forced back towards Wellington Ridge. The Turks had meanwhile captured Mount Meredith and had lined the crest, bringing machine guns into action

At daybreak, as the situation became more acute, General Royston extended the 6th and 7th Light Horse Regiments from the right of 1st Brigade westward, his instructions being to hold Wellington Ridge at all costs. The W.M.R. were in reserve behind the northern slopes of the hill in a depression, and with them were the led horses of the 6th and 7th Regiments. This depression afforded the only available cover for the horses, on account of heavy rifle and machine-gun fire which raked the ground around it, but the horses in massed formation presented a splendid target for enemy air craft, which were then active, and when a number of them suddenly appeared, flying low, some anxious moments were passed. Fortunately, the airmen did not observe the packed horses beneath them, and they directed their bombs, without result, at the Leicester Battery, close by

Just before 5 a.m. the enemy's guns - some of them being 5.9. calibre - opened fire along Wellington Ridge, and they searched the ground in rear The enemy flanking movement continued, and aeroplane bombing became more active. At the same time machine-gun fire from Mount Meredith swept Wellington Ridge, making the southern slopes of the latter untenable, and the 1st Brigade was ordered to withdraw to a knoll further back. A little later the 1st Brigade was driven from the Knoll, but the 2nd Brigade, fighting stubbornly, clung to the western slopes of Wellington Ridge

Divisional headquarters had meanwhile also moved back, and established itself in the W.M.R. camp. Colonel Meredith was then ordered to collect the 1st A.L.H. Brigade, which was retiring on Et Maler, and later one of its regiments was sent to strengthen our right

At seven o'clock the W.M.R. took up a position on the left rear of the 6th and 7th Light Horse Regiments, the movement being carried out at the gallop under very heavy rifle and machine-gun fire. The Turks were then advancing rapidly towards Wellington Ridge, and the 6th and 7th Regiments were withdrawn to take up a line on the right of the W.M.R. the latter covering the retirement. The Turks thereupon occupied Wellington Ridge, and the high ground overlooking the Light Horse camps, which now came under heavy artillery, machine-gun, and rifle fire. It will thus be seen that the line taken up by Colonel Meldrum lay between the Turks and the Et Maler Camps, and it was owing to the stiff resistance maintained there, supported by the fire of the Ayrshire and Leicester Batteries, that the Turkish advance towards Romani railway station was held up

The fight had now reached a very interesting stage. Our defence line was very thinly held; all our regimental reserves had been absorbed into it, and the Infantry reserves were not in sight. The Turks, however, did not appear to fully appreciate the situation; they hesitated for a time on Wellington Ridge, when they might have used their greater numerical strength to better advantage, and it was during this time that fate was to turn against them

Meanwhile the general situation had apparently been viewed with some alarm in the vicinity of Divisional Headquarters, where the orderly-room clerk of the W.M.R. had been ordered to burn the regimental records. The cooking utensils and other impediments had been packed for removal when the quarter-master of the W.M.R. arrived from the firing line, where the Turks had been checked, and he arranged with the cooks to unpack the dixies and serve up tea in the firing line. The cooks responded readily, and in the face of heavy artillery and rifle fire they carried the tea to their comrades, who, having had no time to breakfast, fully appreciated it

The enemy were meanwhile pressing forward between Et Maler and Mount Royston, a big sandhill on the left of his line, three and a-half miles west of Mount Meredith, and during this momentous phase in the operations General Royston was the most noticeable and ubiquitous figure on the battlefield Although wounded himself, he rode amongst his men, for whom he always had a cheery word, inspiring them and exhorting them to take cover, while openly exposing himself. The General was most energetic throughout the fighting, and used up no fewer than eight horses during the day

At 9.45 a composite Regiment of Yeomanry gained touch with the enemy two miles south-west of Mount Royston, the Anzac Division at that time being extended from Wellington Ridge, where the W.M.R. held the left on the line to some sandhills north of Mount Royston, our right, where the Yeomanry soon joined up. A little later two companies from the 156th Infantry Brigade took over part of our line from the 7th L.H. Regiment on the right of the W.M.R., thus enabling the line to be extended further westward to check the enemy advancing there

Meanwhile the N.Z.M.R. Brigade had been advancing from Hill 70, and at eleven o'clock it reached Canterbury Hill, close to Mount Royston, the key of the position. The arrival of the N.Z. Brigade and Yeomanry at this point was most opportune and, commencing to attack immediately, they ultimately changed the whole aspect of the fight. The Turks were entrenched, and they defended stubbornly, but the New Zealanders gradually closed in on them, and by five o'clock, on the approach of the 42nd Infantry Division, General Chaytor was able to thrust all his mounted reserves into the fight, and Mount Royston was captured at the point of the bayonet

At six o'clock the Infantry arrived, too late to take part in the fighting, but they garrisoned Mount Royston whilst the mounted troops continued to attack further on the left

The forward move of the mounted troops on the right flank continued till darkness set in, when an outpost line was taken up by the two L.H. Brigades and two battalions of Infantry, these continuing the line from the right of the 52nd Division to Mount Royston, facing the enemy, who still held Wellington Ridge

Although the 1st and 2nd Brigades had been moving continuously for about twenty hours, and it must be remembered that the W.M.R. and the 6th and 7th Regiments had already been without sleep for two nights, they were confident of dislodging the enemy next morning. The tenacity in holding up the Turks close on their camp and the opportune arrival of the New Zealand Brigade at Mount Royston had saved the day, and it was from that time that the Turks lost their offensive, never to regain it

About 1200 prisoners were taken, also a mountain battery and a machine gun

The W.M.R. casualties were :- Five officers and 19 other ranks wounded

Altogether the battle cost the British about 800 casualties - killed, wounded, and missing. Firing continued after dark all along the line, the enemy using artillery

The 3rd A.L.H. Brigade and the Inverness Battery arrived at Duiedar at 8.30, and halted there for the night. So far, this Brigade had not been engaged

Orders for next day's operations were then issued, they being briefly to the effect that a general advance would commence at daylight to dislodge and drive back the enemy, who had retired to a line of entrenched positions from Hod El Enna, his left, through Katia to Abu Hamra; the Anzac Division to thrust forward all along the line, with its right on Hod El Enna and its left with the 52nd Infantry Division. The latter was to strike at Abu Hamra and the 42nd Division on Katia, but after the initial attack the Infantry gave little assistance during the rest of the day. The 3rd A.L.H

Brigade was directed on Hamisah to turn the Turkish left and cut in behind the enemy, but it made little headway

The counter-attack commenced at four o'clock on the morning pf 5th August, the W.M.R., with the 7th A.L.H. Regiment on its right, and supported on the left by the Welsh Fusiliers, charging with fixed bayonets across the broken country which separated them from the main Turkish position on Wellington Ridge. They encountered heavy rifle and machine-gun fire, but, rushing up the slopes in an irresistible charge, they quickly broke through the Turkish front line. The enemy soon became demoralised, and our troops advanced from ridge to ridge without a stop and completely overwhelmed the Turks, who surrendered in hundreds. Without waiting to hand over the prisoners, Lieut.Colonel Meldrum ordered up his horses and remounted the Regiment, and, taking with him a section of machine-gunners from the 2nd A.L.H. Brigade under Lieutenant Zouch, pursued the retreating Turks towards Katia, gathering prisoners en route

Meanwhile the 1st A.L.H. Brigade on the right had moved south-east on Hod El Enna

At 6.35 General Chauvel was placed in command of all the mounted troops, and as the W.M.R. had commenced the pursuit of the demoralised retreating enemy without orders Divisional Headquarters were notified en route by helio of the Regiment's action and of its intention to push forward

The Regiment relentlessly pursued the enemy, capturing hundreds of prisoners, till it approached Katia, where it came under heavy fire. The eastern portion of Katia was found to be strongly held, and a fusillade of machine guns and rifle fire, supported by a mountain battery, held up the further advance of the Regiment

Dismounting two squadrons, the Officer Commanding took up a position with six machine guns. As the Regiment was unable to advance further without assistance, Headquarters were advised of the situation. The Regiment remained in this position till 9 a.m., closely observing the enemy. Although the numerical strength of the Regiment was very small in comparison with the force opposed to it, its presence so close on the heels of the enemy plainly agitated the latter, who maintained a most vigorous fire from battery machine guns and rifles

After the very successful advance from Romani, during which about 2000 Turks, some Germans, a battery, and six machine guns had been captured, the remainder of the mounted troops commenced to concentrate near Katia, where the W.M.R. were still holding their position close to the rearguard of the enemy and patrolling the surrounding country. These patrols were very successful, and one of them, under Lieutenant Allison, captured 93 prisoners and 80 camels, besides an ammunition supply dump

At 9 a.m., however, Lieut.-Colonel Meldrum received an urgent appeal for assistance from the C.R.A., who, was moving forward with two batteries, and who reported that he was being attacked from the north-east by Turks two miles east of Katib Gannit. Two squadrons of the W.M.R. were immediately withdrawn to protect the Artillery, the other squadron remaining in position to keep touch with the Turkish Main Body; but on their arrival at the position indicated it was found that the attack on the guns had not materialised, though one battery, the Leicesters, had retired. The Ayrshire Battery was brought up. and put into action against the Turkish rearguard, and the two W.M.R. Squadrons again took up their former positions

At 10 a.m. Lieut.-Colonel Meldrum received word that he was temporarily in command of the' 2nd A.L.H. Brigade, vice Brig.-General Royston, wounded, so, handing over the Regiment to Major Spragg, he set to work to gain touch with the 6th and 7th A.L.H. Regiments and to concentrate his Command

Colonel Meldrum's appointment proved a most popular one. His previous series of successes on Gallipoli and elsewhere won for him the confidence and respect of Australians and New Zealanders alike. He fully understood his men. He appreciated the splendid fighting qualities they possessed, and used then to the best advantage. He quickly recognised good work and promptly acknowledged it. The Colonel's indomitable determination and tenacity in defence, his aggressiveness in attack, and frequent use of the bayonet, prompted the Australians to refer affectionately to him as "Fix-Bayonets Bill" - surely a soubriquet to be proud of.

 
Additional Reading:

Battle of Romani, Sinai, August 4 to 5, 1916, Contents

Bir el Abd, Sinai, August 9, 1916

 


Citation: WMR, NZMRB account about Romani

Posted by Project Leader at 12:01 AM EAST
Updated: Tuesday, 7 April 2009 4:46 PM EADT
Australian Mounted Division, AMD, Australian and British Forces Roll of Honour
Topic: AIF - DMC - Aus MD

AMD, AIF

Australian Mounted Division

Roll of Honour

Australian and British Forces


Poppies on the Roll of Honour, Australian War Memorial, Canberra

 

The Roll of Honour contains the names of all the men from Australia and Britain who are known to have served at one time with the Australian Mounted Division and gave their lives in service of this Division, either Dying of Wounds or Killed in Action as a result of their involvement in combat.

 

Roll of Honour

 

Arthur Henry ADAMS, 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

Arthur John ADAMS, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Martin Chicheley ALBRIGHT, 1st/1st Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Died of Wounds, 8 November 1917

Charles ALEXANDER, Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Killed in Action, 12 November 1917

George ALEXANDER, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

William Arthur Francis ALLAN, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 25 September 1918

Jack ALLEN, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 1 December 1917

Thomas Farmer ALLEN, 1st/1st Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

William Robert ALLEN, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

John Clyde ALLISON, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Robert Graham ANDERSON, 1st/1st Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Killed in Action, 12 November 1917

Hans Edward ANDREASEN, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 3 May 1918

Alfred ARNOLD, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 3 May 1918

William Walter ASH, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 3 December 1917

John Henry ASHER, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 31 October 1917

Tasman ATKIN, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 1 May 1918

Ernest Edward AUSTIN, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

 

Percy Howard BADCOCK, 1st/1st Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

William Harold BAIN, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 14 November 1917

Charles BAKER, Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Killed in Action, 12 November 1917

William Matthew BAKER, Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Died of Wounds, 1 December 1917

Francis Edward BARNETT, Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Killed in Action, 20 April 1917

Edward Victor BARROW, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

James William BARRY, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 1 May 1918

Owen Cressy BARRY, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

William Thomas Henry BARRY, Berkshire Yeomanry, Died of Wounds, 19 April 1917

Harry Cyril BASTOW, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Ronald BATES, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 30 April 1918

John William BAXTER, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 7 November 1917

Kenneth Anthony BAYLIS, Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Killed in Action, 12 November 1917

Ernest William BAYLISS, 1st/1st Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

Harold Thomas BELL, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

William Robert BELL, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 1 December 1917

Richard John BELLAMY, 1st/1st Berkshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 21 April 1917

Frederick Rubon BENHAM, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Bernard Charles BENNETT, 1st/1st Dorset Yeomanry (Queen's Own), Killed in Action, 4 May 1917

Keith Clarence BENNETT, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 3 May 1918

Thomas Albert BENNETT, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 11 November 1917

Lewis Richard BERRYMAN, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Lawrence BERWICK, 3rd Light Horse Field Ambulance, Killed in Action, 4 May 1917

Reginald Allan BIRCHENOUGH, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Walter Lewis BISHOP, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 9 October 1918

James BLACK, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 12 November 1917

Robert BLACK, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 3 November 1917

Lancelot Charles BLACKALL, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 1 December 1917

Edward Thomas BLAKE, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 1 May 1918

William BLOOMFIELD, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 12 November 1917

Martin Petrie BLUNDELL, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 23 April 1917

Gilbert John BLYTHMAN, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 22 April 1917

Joseph BOND, 1st/1st Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

John William BOURNE, 1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

Reginald William BRINSMEAD, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

William BROWNEY, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 8 May 1918

Charles BRYANT, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 14 July 1918

Frederick James BUCHAN, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 22 December 1917

Archibald Edward BULLER, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 20 April 1917

William Henry BULLMAN, 1st/1st Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars, Died of Wounds, 31 May 1917

James Thomas BUNEGAR, 1st/1st Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

Leslie Stuart BURNISTON, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 14 July 1918

Albert BURROWS, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 1 December 1917

 

Edwin George Rutherford CAIRNS, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 22 April 1917

Frank Banister CAMPBELL, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 6 November 1917

Albert CARD, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Frederick Michael CARNEY, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

Douglas CARRINGTON, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 4 May 1917

John Ernest CHAPMAN, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 20 April 1917

Allan Patrick CHRISTENSEN, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 11 February 1917

Ernest Richard CHRISTIE, A Squadron 1st/1st Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars, Died of Wounds, 1 June 1917

Ernest CLARKE, 1st/1st Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Died of Wounds, 8 May 1918

Edward Randolph CLEAVER, 3rd Light Horse Brigade Headquarters, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Edward James CLEMENTS, 3rd Light Horse Field Ambulance, Killed in Action, 4 May 1917

John COATES, Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Died of Wounds, 9 May 1918

Harry (Izod) COLDICOTT, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 23 April 1917

George COLEMAN, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 1 November 1917

Francis Aloysius CONNOLLY, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 6 May 1917

James COOK, 1st/1st Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

Albert Edward COOPER, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Albert John Benjamin COOPER, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Harry COOPER, Warwickshire Yeomanry, Died of Wounds, 4 November 1917

Alfred CORK, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 4 May 1918

William Frederick COX, 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Died of Wounds, 20 April 1917

William Edwin CROCKETT, Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Michael Parnel CRONIN, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 4 May 1918

Norman Russell CROUCH, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Patrick Augustine CROWE, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 25 September 1918

Frederick CRUTCHLEY, Queen's Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Died of Wounds, 19 April 1917

Harold Nesbit CUMMINS, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 6 November 1917

 

Lawrence E DABBS, 1st/1st Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Died of Wounds, 15 November 1917

George DARE, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 12 November 1917

Allan Vincent DARGAVEL, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Perry Thomas DAVIS, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 10 November 1917

Robert DELANEY, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 29 December 1917

Harold George DENLEY, 1st/1st Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Died of Wounds, 8 November 1917

Francis James DENNIS, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 3 May 1918

John Edward DEVITT, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Daryl James Gilchrist DODDS, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 12 November 1917

Geoffrey Hardwick DODSON, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 30 May 1917

Alexander DONALDSON, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 12 November 1917

William DONALDSON, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 31 October 1917

Arthur William DORE, D Squadron 1st/1st Berkshire Yeomanry, Died of Wounds, 6 May 1917

Alexander Mark DOWNIE, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 1 November 1917

Leo DUCKMANTON, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

William George DUGUID, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 11 April 1918

William James DUNBAR, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

John Denis DUNN, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 6 November 1917

Patrick Bernard DWYER, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 6 November 1917

John James DYER, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

 

Francis Thomas EACOTT, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 21 April 1917

Henry John EATON, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 4 July 1917

George EDDINGTON, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 3 May 1918

John Vaughan EDWARDS, Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Killed in Action, 12 November 1917

John Wesley EDWARDS, 1st/1st Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

Rupert Harry Adams EDWARDS, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Thomas William EDWARDS, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 20 May 1917

James EGAN, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 August 1918

Walter ELDRIDGE, Berkshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Frederick Bertram ELLIS, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 6 November 1917

Herbert Pearce ELLIS, B Squadron Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Died of Wounds, 1 December 1917

Cuthbert ELSDON, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 4 May 1918

Clifford Ward EMERY, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 1 May 1918

William EMMERT, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 1 November 1917

Thomas ERRINGTON, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 30 March 1918

Arthur Leslie EVANS, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 30 March 1918

 

Frederick Garnet FARLOW, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 12 November 1917

Henry Harry FARR, 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 9 November 1917

Frederick Roland FAULKNER, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

George FAY, 3rd Light Horse Field Ambulance, Killed in Action, 22 August 1918

Cyril John Alfred FLYNN, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 1 November 1917

William Bateman FORSTER, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 7 November 1917

John Walter FRANCIS, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

John James GALLAGHER, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 30 March 1918

William John GARDNER, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Alfred Joseph GARRATT, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 25 September 1918

Norman William GATES, 3rd Light Horse Field Ambulance, Killed in Action, 21 May 1918

Cecil GERMAIN, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 10 November 1917

Hugh GILLIES, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 1 December 1917

Arthur GILLIGAN, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 28 March 1918

Lucas Joseph Paul GOLIK, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 17 November 1917

Alick Ferguson GOODE, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 9 October 1918

David GORDON, 1st/1st Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Died of Wounds, 5 November 1917

Allan George GOYDER, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 9 May 1917

Walton Robert GRAYSON, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Stephen GREELEY, Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Edward GREEN, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 1 December 1917

Walter Neil GRIFFIN, 1st/1st Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

Cecil Harcourt GROVE, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Arthur Reginald GUNSON, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 31 March 1918

Herbert Henry GYLER, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

 

George Joseph HAAG, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 25 September 1918

William HAINS, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 4 May 1918

John Albert HARRELL, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 2 May 1918

Reginald HARRINGTON, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 5 December 1917

Albert Victor HARRISON, 1st/1st Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

Albert Harris HARVEY, 14th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 25 September 1918

Herbert William HARWOOD, Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Harold HEATH, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 15 May 1918

Austin James HEITHERSAY, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 2 May 1918

Herbert James HENRY, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 30 March 1918

Elidye John Bernard HERBERT, Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, attached to 19TH Machine Gun Squadron, Killed in Action, 12 November 1917

Havelock HIGGS, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 10 November 1917

Dennis HILL, 1st/1st Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

Cecil Thomas HILLS, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Oliver Ashover HIND, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Guy HOOPER, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 1 May 1918

Harold Walter HORNBY, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 2 April 1918

Roy William HUDSON, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 12 April 1919

James John HULL, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 7 November 1917

Albert Wilson HUNDY, 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Died of Wounds, 9 November 1917

Herbert William HUNT, 1st/1st Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Died of Wounds, 5 November 1917

William Irvine HUTCHINSON, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 30 March 1918

 

Aubrey John JACKSON, Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Claude Henry JACKSON, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 28 March 1918

Arthur Lethero JAMES, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Trevor William JAMES, Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Died of Wounds, 20 April 1917

John Malcolm JAMIESON, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 10 April 1918

Eric James JARRETT, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 6 November 1917

John JOHNSTON, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 3 November 1917

Stanley McGillivray JOHNSTON, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 19 November 1917

Harry Harold JONES, Berkshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 24 August 1917

Keith David JONES, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 3 November 1917

Reginald Raymond JONES, Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Killed in Action, 12 May 1918

Jesse JORDAN, Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Alfred James JURY, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 19 April 1917

 

George Whiting KELLY, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Edward Charles KENDRICK, 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

John Joseph KENNEDY, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

John Joseph KENNY, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 1 November 1917

Cameron Harries KERR, Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

William Edward KERRIGAN, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 3 November 1917

Thomas Harold KIMPTON, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 27 November 1917

Charles David KING, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Sidney Lloyd KING, A Squadron 1st/1st Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars, Killed in Action, 31 May 1917

Adolph KLAR, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 25 September 1918

Ernest Hyalman KORTMAN, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 1 May 1918

William Henry Hayes KYTE, 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

 

Alfred James LAKE, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 18 November 1917

Robert William LAKIN, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 4 May 1918

Leonard James LAMBERT, 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

Leslie Reed LANGTRY, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Alfred LAWTON, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 10 May 1918

John William LEADER, Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars, Died of Wounds, 20 April 1917

Albert Emmanuel LEE, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 11 April 1918

William James LEE, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 20 April 1917

Claude Edward LEWIS, 1st/1st Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Died of Wounds, 24 June 1918

John LINDON, 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Died of Wounds, 12 November 1917

Timothy Michael LINEHAN, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 3 May 1918

Richard Bright LITCHFIELD, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 3 June 1918

Henry LITTLE, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 7 November 1917

Joseph Alfred LITTLEHALES, Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Died of Wounds, 14 November 1917

William Horace LLOYD, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 25 September 1918

Andrew Anderson LOUDEN, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 28 March 1918

Cecil Flinders LUCAS, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 23 April 1917

Charles Hugh LYON, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 July 1918

 

Clement MAHONEY, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 2 May 1918

Albert Frederick MALTRAVERS, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 5 June 1918

George Noble MANN, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 2 June 1919

John Henry MANTON, 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Died of Wounds, 28 April 1917

Robert MANUEL, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 3 May 1918

Clifford Roy MARR, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 23 November 1917

George Henry MARSH, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 27 September 1918

Charles MARTIN, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 30 April 1918

William John MARTIN, 1st/1st Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Died of Wounds, 5 November 1917

Ernest MATTHEWS, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 22 April 1917

Joseph Henry MATTHEWS, Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Christopher Alfred MAUSOLF, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 1 November 1917

Leslie Cecil MAYGAR VC, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Reginald Edward MAYWOOD, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 4 May 1917

William McBURNIE, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 16 November 1917

James Joseph McCAGUE, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 17 April 1917

William Alexander McCAREY, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 11 December 1917

Clarence James McCARRON, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 25 September 1918

Michael Henry McCARTHY, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 1 November 1917

Lionel Oscar McCRAE, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 10 April 1918

Duncan Campbell McDOUGALL, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Herbert McGILL, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Stephen Percival McGINTY, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 25 September 1918

William Hutchison McINTOSH, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Norman Joseph McKAY, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Brian McKENNA, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 2 May 1918

William Fraser McKERROW, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 14 December 1917

John McLEOD, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 20 April 1917

Angus McMASTER, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 8 May 1918

Peter McMILLAN, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 7 June 1918

Provo William MEDHURST, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 25 September 1918

Harry George MENZIES, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 20 April 1917

Benjamin Peter George MEREDITH, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 19 April 1917

Charles Robert METHVEN, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 30 April 1918

Ernest William MILLARD, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 6 November 1917

William Casper MILLER, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 7 November 1917

Charles Leslie MITCHELL, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 2 May 1918

George Henry MITCHELL, 1st/1st Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Killed in Action, 2 November 1917

Sydney Newman MITCHELL, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 19 April 1917

Harold MOORE, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 1 July 1917

Leslie MOORE, 1st/1st Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Frederick Richard MORGAN, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 29 September 1918

Robert Herbert MORLEY, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 19 April 1917

Arthur Oliver MORRELL, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 13 October 1918

Donald James MORRISON, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 6 October 1918

William Gordon MORRISSEY, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 29 March 1918

Ralph James MORTIMER, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 14 July 1918

Kenneth Andrew MUDGE, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 1 November 1917

Marcus Bowerman MUIR, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 31 October 1917

Sydney Roy MULDOON, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Duncan Victor MULHOLLAND, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Alexander George Roderick MUNRO, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Albert John MURRAY, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 3 August 1917

 

Arthur William NAGLE, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

James NASH, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 19 April 1917

William Foxwell NASH, 1st/1st Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Killed in Action, 26 March 1917

George NEILSON, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 27 June 1917

Ernest Henry NETHERBY, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 1 December 1917

William NETTLETON, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 3 May 1918

August Charles Frederick NEUMANN, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Gilbert NORRIS, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Michael NUSS, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 7 November 1917

 

Ronald Ewan O'BRIEN, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Peter Matthew O'DOWD, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 1 November 1917

Roy OERMANN, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 25 September 1918

Timothy James O'NEILL, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 7 November 1917

Joseph Lionel Alexander OSBORNE, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 10 November 1917

 

Percy George PAGET, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 2 May 1918

Ralph Lishman PALETHORPE, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Frederick William PARKER, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 28 September 1918

William PATCHETT, 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Died of Wounds, 14 November 1917

Harry Beckett PATERSON, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 27 April 1917

Albert Thomas PAXTON, Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

John Eric PEARSON, B Squadron 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 2 November 1917

Maurice James PENSON, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Sidney Arthur PERRY, Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

Victor Charles PERRY, D Squadron 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Charles Oxley PIESSE, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

George Frederick PLUMMER, 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

Frederick POND, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Claude POWELL, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 13 November 1917

Frederick James POWELL, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 16 July 1918

William George PURVIS, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 24 April 1917

 

John Thain RAMSAY, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 25 September 1918

Richard Thomas RANDALL, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 28 August 1918

Thomas Alexander RANKIN, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 7 November 1917

George Edward RATHJEN, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 2 November 1917

Frederick William REDMAN, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 1 June 1918

Michael Steveard REIDY, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 19 July 1918

John REINEKE, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 27 April 1917

John Thomas REYNOLDS, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 8 November 1917

Rupert REYNOLDS, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 20 April 1917

Edward RICHARDSON, Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Killed in Action, 2 May 1918

William Ernest RICHTER, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 30 September 1918

Eric Bertram RIDGWAY, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 2 May 1918

Frederick Rowland RIGBY, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 19 April 1917

Kelvin ROACH, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 3 May 1918

Arthur Frank ROBERTS, Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Killed in Action, 30 April 1918

Richard George ROBINSON, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 3 May 1918

Stanley Oswald ROBINSON, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 7 November 1917

Richard Louis Stanford ROGERS, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 11 April 1918

James ROSS, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Richard Calo ROSS, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 25 May 1918

Dedrich ROZENFELD, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 3 October 1918

James RUSHTON, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 25 September 1918

 

Edmond Herbert SACKETT, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 2 May 1918

John James SAINSBURY, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Ernest James SAMMONS, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 19 April 1917

Harold SAMUELS, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 3 May 1918

Frank Leslie SCHUYLER, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 3 May 1918

Alan Robertson SCOTT, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Alexander Charles SCOTT, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Andrew SCOTT, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 3 May 1918

Ernest Herbert SCOTT, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 10 July 1918

William Royal SELKIRK, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Leslie Raymond SELLERS, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 11 April 1918

Patrick SEXTON, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

William Henry SHADFORTH, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 3 May 1918

Arthur Edward SHEPPARD, Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Died of Wounds, 5 May 1918

Thomas Patrick SHINE, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 July 1918

Charles John SHRIEVE, 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 11 November 1917

James Haining SINCLAIR, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 8 May 1918

Alfred John SMITH, 3rd Light Horse Field Ambulance, Killed in Action, 2 November 1917

Clifford SMITH, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 22 October 1917

Cyril Gordon SMITH, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 25 June 1917

Frederick Arthur SMITH, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 28 March 1918

John William SMITH, 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

Thomas William SMITH, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 18 March 1919

Keith Dawson SPEERING, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 30 April 1918

Frederick William SPRULES, 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

Wallace STACEY, 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

Hartley James STEWART, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 30 September 1918

Sydney John STEWART, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

John Thomas STILL, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 July 1918

Gerald Cunliffe STONES, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Alfred Thomas STUCHBERY, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Richard SWALE, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Sydney Louis SWIFT, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 23 September 1918

 

Eric Fullerton TAIT, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Eric Darcy TAPFIELD, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 26 September 1918

Phillip Stanley TATNELL, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 4 November 1917

James Raymond TAYLOR, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 19 April 1917

Richard TAYLOR, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 7 November 1917

Thomas Henry TAYLOR, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 1 December 1917

William TAYLOR, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 3 November 1917

William Fairbairn TEMPLE, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 6 November 1917

Charles Vivian THOMAS, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

John Arthur THOMSON, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 7 November 1917

Arthur THURLOW, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 3 May 1918

Stephen John TOMKINS, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 3 May 1918

Francis Herbert TRUBODY, Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Killed in Action, 2 May 1918

Percy Oswald TRUMAN, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 3 May 1918

George Thomas TURNER, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 4 June 1918

John Hawkins TURNER, 1st/1st Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Killed in Action, 8 November 1917

George Reginald TYRRELL, Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 4 November 1917

 

Rudolf VALINTINE, 1st Squadron Warwickshire Yeomanry, Died of Wounds, 12 November 1917

Reginald Beavis VICKERY, 1st/1st Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Died of Wounds, 8 November 1917

 

John Mercer WALKER, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 30 April 1918

William WALLACE, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 30 April 1918

Walter Arthur WALLER, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 21 April 1917

Charles Henry WARD, A Squadron 1st/1st Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Killed in Action, 29 May 1917

William Charles WARD, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 13 October 1917

Rowland William WATERS, Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

William Gilroy WATSON, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 30 April 1918

Alfred WATT, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 14 July 1918

William Victor WEABER, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 25 September 1918

Alfred Charles WEAVER, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 30 September 1918

Robert Henry WEIR, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Ernest Walter WESTON, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Harold Wensley WETHERELL, 1st/1st Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Killed in Action, 26 March 1917

Roy Albert WHEATON, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 11 May 1918

Thomas Henry WHEELER, Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Killed in Action, 9 January 1917

Clifford Knapsey WHEELINS, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 19 April 1917

John WHEILDON, Warwickshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

William George Phillips WHILDON, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

Frank Issac WHITE, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 30 March 1918

Irwin Munro WHITFIELD, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 4 May 1917

John WHORTON, Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Killed in Action, 30 April 1918

Charles Calliope WILEY, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 17 November 1917

Henry John WILLIAMS, 4th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 2 May 1918

Percy Ellis WILLIAMS, 1st/1st Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcester Yeomanry), Killed in Action, 12 November 1917

Harold John WILLS, Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars, Killed in Action, 24 August 1917

Alexander WILSON, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 19 April 1917

Francis Ernest WILSON, 10th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Alfred Edward WILTSHIRE, D Squadron Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Killed in Action, 12 November 1917

Philip WOLLEN, 1st Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, Killed in Action, 12 November 1917

Dougald WOODHOUSE, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 25 September 1918

Frank Bernard Martin WOODNUTT, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 10 April 1918

Alexander Robertson WRIGHT, 8th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 3 May 1918

Thomas Stanley WRIGHT, 9th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 6 November 1917

Philip Musgraven WROUGHTON, 1st/1st Berkshire Yeomanry, Killed in Action, 19 April 1917

Cedric WYNDHAM, 12th Light Horse Regiment, Killed in Action, 31 October 1917

 

Herbert YOUNG, 11th Light Horse Regiment, Died of Wounds, 19 April 1917

  

Lest We Forget

 

Acknowledgement: Many thanks to Steve Becker who provided much of the raw material that appears in this item.
 

 

Further Reading:

Australian Mounted Division, AMD, AIF

Australian Mounted Division, AMD, Australian and British Forces Roll of Honour

Battles where Australians fought, 1899-1920

 


Citation: Australian Mounted Division, AMD, Australian and British Forces Roll of Honour

Posted by Project Leader at 12:01 AM EAST
Updated: Friday, 11 February 2011 9:22 AM EAST
Bert Schramm's Diary, 10 February 1919
Topic: Diary - Schramm

Diaries of AIF Servicemen

Bert Schramm

 

During part of the course of his military service with the AIF, 2823 Private Herbert Leslie Schramm, a farmer from White's River, near Tumby Bay on the Eyre Peninsular, kept a diary of his life. Bert was not a man of letters so this diary was produced with great effort on his behalf. Bert made a promise to his sweetheart, Lucy Solley, that he would do so after he received the blank pocket notebook wherein these entries are found. As a Brigade Scout since September 1918, he took a lead part in the September 1918 breakout by the Allied forces in Palestine. Bert's diary entries are placed alongside those of the 9th Light Horse Regiment to which he belonged and to the 3rd Light Horse Brigade to which the 9th LHR was attached. On this basis we can follow Bert in the context of his formation.

 Bert Schramm's Diary, 10 February 1919

 


Bert Schramm's Handwritten Diary, 9 - 13 February 1919

[Click on page for a larger print version.]

Diaries

Bert Schramm

Monday, February 10, 1919

Bert Schramm's Location - Tripoli, Lebanon.

Bert Schramm's Diary - Weather fine again. Divisional sports today but I wasn't interested enough to go with them. Heard a very interesting lecture tonight be an American who was interned in Turkey.

 

 

9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary

9th Light Horse Regiment Location - Tripoli, Lebanon.

9th Light Horse Regiment War Diary -  0930 Divisional Sports held on 3rd Light Horse Brigade ground.

1400 Sports continued.

 

Darley

Darley, TH, With the Ninth Light Horse in the Great War, Adelaide, Hassell Press, 1924.

No Entry


Previous: Bert Schramm's Diary, 9 February 1919

Next: Bert Schramm's Diary, 11 February 1919

 

Further Reading:

9th Light Horse Regiment AIF War Diary - Complete day by day list

Bert Schramm Diary 

Bert Schramm Diary - Complete day by day list

 

Additional Reading:

Darley, TH, With the Ninth Light Horse in the Great War, Adelaide, Hassell Press, 1924.

 


Citation: Bert Schramm's Diary, 10 February 1919


Posted by Project Leader at 12:01 AM EAST
Updated: Sunday, 3 May 2009 9:45 PM EADT

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